Brewing Activities (2019)

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by jbakajust1, Jan 2, 2019.

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  1. MrOH

    MrOH Meyvn (1,069) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    I used mahlab in a huge quad once. I like what it brings, a little almond, a little cinnamon along with the cherry
     
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  2. 209Hill

    209Hill Initiate (38) Dec 22, 2016 Virginia

    Brewed my annual stout last night. Maris Otter / Chocolate / Coffee / Flaked Oats, with a little Columbus and US-05. I added lactose to this year's edition and will add vanilla tincture before bottling. Naturally cooled overnight and pitched early this morning.
     
  3. KCUnited

    KCUnited Initiate (193) Nov 11, 2014 Illinois
    Trader

    I can definitely see mahlab showcasing well in a quad.
     
  4. invertalon

    invertalon Champion (803) Jan 27, 2009 Ohio
    Society Trader

    Have my apricot/mango Berliner now chilling, as it is now complete chomping through all the sugars from the fruit additions in the keg. Had to blow it off at first because it got so vigorous, so I didn't catch the spund on time and it only got a little bit of natural carb. So got it on some gas the next few days to perk it up before tapping.

    This weekend I will be brewing a new pale, west coast style (yay!). About 5.1% ABV with Warrior, Comet, Rakau and Simcoe. Going with good ol' US-05 on this one. Expecting around 30-40 IBU. Only a single boil addition of the Warrior (about 25 IBU worth), the rest of the hops are whirlpool below 180F and dry hop.
     
  5. SABERG

    SABERG Poo-Bah (2,264) Sep 16, 2007 Massachusetts
    Society

    Finished packaging an ESB, all the numbers came in correct.
    Cheers all
     
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  6. skleice

    skleice Aspirant (271) Aug 6, 2015 Connecticut

    Just kegged/dry hopped GF Enigma Pale & Cascade Pale ale. Same yeast, but slightly different grain bills for comparison.
     
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  7. invertalon

    invertalon Champion (803) Jan 27, 2009 Ohio
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    Brewing my new pale at the moment, currently cooling the wort. OG of 1.051, bittered with about 30 IBU of Warrior and whirlpool hopped with Rakau and Comet (under 180F). Will have a single, 4oz dry hop near FG with 1oz each of Comet, Simcoe, Galaxy and Rakau. Pitching Cali Ale.

    Looking forward to a nice, crisp west coast pale. The comet I have smells unreal, if that drives along with the Simcoe/Galaxy in there, should be in for a treat. The Rakau seems pretty mild, aroma wise. So not sure how much influence that will have. Originally planned 2oz of Rakau in dry hop, but once I smelled the hops, subbed an ounce for Galaxy.
     
    #367 invertalon, Apr 28, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2019
  8. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,860) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
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    Just crushed grain for Second Breakfast, an oatmeal stout, of course. Low gravity, because it's not Elevensies yet.
     
  9. wasatchback

    wasatchback Disciple (347) Jan 12, 2014 Bahamas
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    Brewed a Pale Ale on Friday.
    Golden Promise
    1lb Malted Wheat
    1lb Munich I
    3ml hopshot at 60
    Citra, Cashmere, touch of Loral WP
    Citric acid for pH adjustments
    Vermont Ale yeast
    1.052

    Brewed a more WC inspired IPA yesterday.
    Golden Promise
    1lb Carapils
    2% Honey Malt
    5ml hopshot at 60
    .5oz Zeus @ 45
    Citra/Strata/Simcoe Cryo at WP
    TYB Midwest Ale yeast
    1.066
    Upped the Ca levels on this one.

    Managed to score an 11lb (was actually 12.4?) bag of hand selected Citra from one of west coasts better hop focused breweries. Totally different than any Citra I’ve ever been able to get that’s for sure. Lot of Citra beers in my future this summer.
     
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  10. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
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    Hey y'all!

    So I just entered the Warren Michigan big brew festival this weekend. I picked up a lot of tricks and I saw how the bigger operations did it. I have been finding simplicity in some of my beers and the flavors I was able to blend together while utilizing a bucket and a brew kettle, that's it! When it comes to boiling and fermenting I add it all in without muslin bags or strainers, I strain everything out at the end of my batch after I get done with it. I also learned a ton about bottling and what not to do! So what do you guys like to do and what are some techniques you all utilize?

    Thank you.
     
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  11. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Devotee (465) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    Well,,,,,, I. Brew all grain, so I use a mash tun and go thru the usual 1 hour mash cycle at a temp of 148-156 depending on the beer being made. Then sparge with 170 water, boil for 1 hour adding hops as I want for the beer. Cool the beer with a immersion chiller to 60-70 , add yeast and away we go. Add dry hops after ferment is done for 3-5 days then bottle. Pretty standard.

    I am interested if you are boiling with the grains in the kettle, or are u using extract?
     
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  12. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader


    Pretty standard indeed. The hops and the mash cycle are all techniques I picked up watching others. I can always do that and utilize the standard techniques, when it comes to the finished product it is going to be strained anyway. So I looked up the ways the European and English used to do it, low tech always ends up creating beer that will have a lot of flavors.

    I am boiling with both grains, extract and any other ingredient that might work with the flavors. I then usually add hope pellets as a fermentable and then any other flavor I might think would work before pitching. Then I usually add a good amount of dry yeast to let it work through all of those flavors.

    Having a family that I tend to be the only IPA drinker, I tend to stay away from styles I want to create and I just try to stay with mellow crowd pleasing flavors, which tended to work over this past weekend.

    So when it comes to standard processes, what do you like to do differently?
     
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  13. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (1,882) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Hopefully you're not actually boiling grains. But if you are, don't. And have a look at www.howtobrew.com

    Hops are not fermentable. Well, at least not in the normal sense. I'm getting the impression you're fairly inexperienced or don't yet have the vocabulary to communicate exactly what you're doing. Either way, reading www.howtobrew.com would be helpful.
     
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  14. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    The water gets hot enough I turn it off and mix it with the malt extract, to take advantage of the temperature. You could always cook the grains and get a wort out of those too. I was just short cutting it and putting some potency to the batch. Which is why I am using yeast, I am not inexperienced, just lacking equipment and giving it some flare. I will check out that site for sure. So far this has been the best thread on BA. I ferment the hop pellets, I used the wrong term there, I know they should add aroma to the batch but in interest of preservation, this keeps well in a bucket.

    I picked up a lot of tricks of the trade and I now know how to create a standard beer with a hop schedule and the proper way to create mash and wort. This is all well and good but there is a point where all that is just too standard. Now it is time for me to sort some things out with my previous batches, but as far as crowd pleasers go, that goal was accomplished!
     
  15. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    Anything can be fermentable, anything can be dry hopped or preserved in the flavor profile and anything can be infused. It just takes creativity and some timing.
     
  16. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (1,882) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    No. Many, many things cannot. In terms of Sacch c. yeast strains, sugars are fermentable. (And not even all sugars, at that.) That's it. Nothing else is fermentable.

    But again, I suspect you do not have the vocabulary to have these kinds of discussions without frustration. ( www.howtobrew.com )
     
  17. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    Dry yeast is pretty sturdy stuff, I have fermented six batches with this technique and all have yielded alcohol from it. If it does not ferment then it dissolves adding to the potency of the batch. Like I said, I picked up a ton of tips and tricks, but picking up the dry yeast from the store helps everything. I might have to try bakers yeast at one of these times, I am pushing the boundaries instead of staying in check boxes or traditions.
     
  18. jbakajust1

    jbakajust1 Crusader (736) Aug 25, 2009 Oregon

    Rakau is a worthless hop IMHO. It takes a boat load to get a mildish Noble and fruity note. I had a chance to grow them and decided against it.
     
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  19. JohnConnorforealthistime

    JohnConnorforealthistime Initiate (66) Mar 10, 2016 Wisconsin
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    What are you getting out of the comet?
     
  20. Buck89

    Buck89 Poo-Bah (3,137) Feb 7, 2015 Tennessee
    Society Trader

    Yesterday evening, I racked my Witbier from fermenter (SS Brew Bucket) to keg under closed transfer. I decided to use a little pressure this time (~1 PSI) with my new regulator, but I forgot to turn the PSI down before opening the valve. I wrongly assumed that a new regulator would have the dial set at zero on purchase. Two seconds of 10 PSI was enough to blow the lid and point out my stupidity:rage:. Fortunately, I think I only need to replace three lid clamps and the everything should be OK.
     
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  21. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
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    This is why I farm house ale it in that respect. The less restriction the better has been working for me.
     
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  22. Buck89

    Buck89 Poo-Bah (3,137) Feb 7, 2015 Tennessee
    Society Trader

    Yep - I was mainly "practicing" before my next hoppy beer, which turned out to be a good decision.
     
  23. invertalon

    invertalon Champion (803) Jan 27, 2009 Ohio
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    Not the best at picking up detailed descriptors, but it just smells incredible. Perhaps more herbal and dank with a bright citrus type note. It's pungent though. I've had an all comet pale in the past from a brewery, it was fantastic. I hope it shines through on this pale... Accented with Galaxy and Simcoe as well, should be killer in theory.
     
  24. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    I have done it with six different styles so far. They all have turned out to be quite different, not on the bad sense. It has been a bit in the experimental phase, I saw some high tech stuff before but I also think that sometimes simplicity gets lost and does not make the trial and error any more fun. I want to try a hoppy beer, I just do not know which route I want to go.
     
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  25. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Devotee (465) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    Well, different could be catagorized a lot of ways.

    For me some things different would b shortened boil times, sometimes only 30 minutes. Making my own toasted woods and using varying amounts like 1-8 oz sometimes for a week other times for a month.

    I secondary most of my beers which recintly is frowned upon, but it works well for me.

    So different, maybe and maybe not.

    Vikeman does have good advise as far as reading how to brew.
    One cannot have to much knowledge. Then you can do what you want.

    Have fun
     
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  26. MrOH

    MrOH Meyvn (1,069) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    @JimboBrews54 if you're happy with what you're doing and don't see any reason to change it, go on with your bad self. If you ever think that you might want to share your beers with someone who knows what's up and doesn't care about your feelings, or entering a competition, please read How to Brew
     
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  27. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
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    Exactly, that is what makes it fun!
     
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  28. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
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    I entered a competition, I did well. How to brew is just another standard of what you might want to create. I understand the concepts, I just don't care because well it is fun to find a way to see what I can create with a different way to brew it.
     
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  29. wasatchback

    wasatchback Disciple (347) Jan 12, 2014 Bahamas
    Trader

    Added a metric sh*t ton of maple syrup to an imperial milk stout type of concoction. I simmered it for a few hours to reduce it and hopefully intensify the flavor. We’ll see. Glad I have relatives that sugar.
     
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  30. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    Totally sounds like something I would do. I added brown sugar and bourbon to my first concoction, a red ale. Really amplified the flavor, I will only be adding pints now. Not whole bottles to turn into a jungle juice mixture.
     
  31. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    Another question on this how to brew thing, if everything like hops, sugars, grains and malt extract will eventually dissolve or molecular bond with the yeast, what is the point of doing all that extra work and not letting mother nature take over?
     
  32. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    The flavors I have gotten from my process have been very balanced and all it takes is some refrigeration at times.
     
  33. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (1,882) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    What are you talking about?

    No, you don't. Or you do and you're trolling.
     
  34. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
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    No trolling here, it is called old English brewing, look into it. I do understand the concepts, I am just not an all mash brewer and I will refine everything when i have the equipment. Which I kind of do already, just a hassle. I was talking about yeast and what it can do, anything can turn into sugar and almost any kind of plant based, grain based or bread based product can be converted into alcohol given the right environment.
     
  35. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (1,882) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    I'm somewhat familiar with English brewing traditions. Nothing you have posted reminds me of them, except for the part where you said "Which is why I am using yeast." Yeast is definitely part of the English traditions. And every other brewing tradition.

    No. Not even in "old England."
     
  36. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    Well when I was reading up on brewing, that is where I started. I have done it with bread and I have done it with all kinds of other cooking. The same goes for brewing, you are going to get it either way.
     
  37. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
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    My bad it carried over from Germany to England, traditions carried throughout brewing. But what do I know, I have not researched anything at all...

    https://www.andechs.de/en/brewery/brewing-process/
     
  38. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (1,882) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Umm, okay, you linked to a page describing decoction mashing, which has never been a part of English brewing tradition. Nor is it what you're doing. The processes on the other pages at the site also do not resemble what you've been saying. What a waste of time.
     
  39. JimboBrews54

    JimboBrews54 Champion (875) Apr 22, 2018 Michigan
    Trader

    Well then, that was not what they were suggesting at the monasteries they have been brewing at all throughout Europe. It has carried over into many traditions of brewing, how do you not know that is not what I am doing. That is pretty much what I am doing besides some minor implications to it all. It resembles what i have been doing, just on a much smaller scale, but what do I know, I am only serve safe certified and have been cooking my whole life!
     
  40. VikeMan

    VikeMan Poo-Bah (1,882) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Society

    How do I know? Because you can't decoct an extract batch.

    Lol. Troll.
     
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