Brut IPA

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by GreenKrusty101, Aug 9, 2018 at 7:30 PM.

  1. GreenKrusty101

    GreenKrusty101 Defender (699) Dec 4, 2008 Nevada

    OK, a Brut IPA should have added enzymes (even that is debatable if using Brett I guess)...but when should the enzymes be added? I'm seeing anywhere from mash at 122*F with 5pH to when pitching the yeast. I plan on using amylase...what say you?
     
  2. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Crusader (745) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania
    Premium Trader

    I've never done this, but I'm not sure why you'd want to add them during the mash, as you already have active enzymes there and I'm not sure what at temperature glucoamylase is denatured. Adding it post-cooling seems like the right answer to me.
     
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  3. MrOH

    MrOH Crusader (773) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    The NB Brut IPA kit has two different enzymes, Alpha Amylase added to the mash, and Amyloglucosidase added with the yeast
     
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  4. GreenKrusty101

    GreenKrusty101 Defender (699) Dec 4, 2008 Nevada

    Anyone have sanitation problems adding enzymes when pitching? Looks like the Amyloglucosidase might be sanitized already?
     
  5. Dave_S

    Dave_S Initiate (45) May 18, 2017 England

    I used 1cc of amyloglucosidase when primary fermentation was beginning to slow down and left it for a few more days before dry hopping. Seemed to work - I ended up at 1.000.
     
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  6. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,569) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    Jeff (@hopfenunmaltz), have you formulated your plan as regards enzymes for the Brut IPA that you are contemplating brewing?

    Cheers!
     
  7. telejunkie

    telejunkie Aspirant (232) Sep 14, 2007 Vermont

    Not sure why NB would add amylase enzyme...should be plenty of that in the grains. Amylo is what you want...can add it to the mash and should take a few extra points off the FG. Add it to the fermenter, i've heard post-peak fermentation like you would a sugar addition and it'll run. Don't plan on repitching the yeast though unless you want another uber dry beer (thanks Dave Berg for that pointer). Finally if bottling, you better be sure the fermentation is done. This will be an unstable beer.
     
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  8. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Initiate (186) Dec 30, 2003 Wisconsin

    The term and concept of "Brut IPA" makes me sad.

    Add the enzymes at pitching. Or... ask yourself why you're not just pitching 3711 or Belle Saison instead of enzymes.
     
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  9. GreenKrusty101

    GreenKrusty101 Defender (699) Dec 4, 2008 Nevada

    Going to be a pseudo brut...adding to mash with some minute rice, a little sugar in the boil, and more bittering hops than usual for a brut IPA(25 ibus of sterling)...Huell Melon, Sterling, and Nelson Sauvin very late. As for the Saison yeast...that's crazy talk :grimacing:
     
  10. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Meyvn (1,362) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    Amylo or equivalent product in the primary. You can find it in the LHBS distillation section.
     
  11. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Meyvn (1,362) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    Amylo is the same enzyme those produce. If you just add the enzyme you can avoid the phenolics and esters those yeast produce.
     
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  12. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Initiate (186) Dec 30, 2003 Wisconsin

    Yeah but phenolics and esters are yummy anyway. Just sayin'. :slight_smile:
     
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  13. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Meyvn (1,362) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    Sure, depending on the desired results.
     
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  14. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,715) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Premium

    I never had one of these beers and haven't really followed the story too closely, so forgive me if this has been discussed elsewhere... @GreenKrusty101 alludes to a pseudo Brut where sugar is subbed for malt to dry out beer, an approach many of us have taken for English, IPA, and Belgian styles, but maybe not to the extreme of a Brut IPA. How do results of a pseudo approach like this compare to the cold-side enzymatic approach?
     
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  15. GreenKrusty101

    GreenKrusty101 Defender (699) Dec 4, 2008 Nevada

    I might be able to tell you anecdotally, shortly. I'm not really looking for a 1.00 FG beer...just something in the .007/.008 range. Cheers
     
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  16. MrOH

    MrOH Crusader (773) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    Because you don't want the phenols?
     
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  17. MrOH

    MrOH Crusader (773) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    I've never had a "proper" Brut IPA made by a brewery, but I tried this approach by using honey for ~50% of fermentables. Turned out plenty dry (finished at .999), but I over bittered. Had it been a saison, it probably would have been ok due to the extra body from the glycols(? I think that's the term), but a bit much for such a thin beer. Other than that, I enjoyed it.
     
  18. EvenMoreJesus

    EvenMoreJesus Crusader (745) Jun 8, 2017 Pennsylvania
    Premium Trader

    It's glycerol, but close enough.
     
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