Craft Adjunct Lagers

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by unlikelyspiderperson, Oct 12, 2020.

  1. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (1,598) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    I've been speculating for a while that heritage, regional, and novel grains are going to be the next big thing in US "craft" beer. I've seen this showing up in ales, especially wild and farmhouse ales but also in ipas.

    I'm curious if folks are seeing these unusual grains used in lagers at all yet? Whether its true adjuncts like corn or rice, or heritage barley varieties I'm curious to know what y'all are seeing and if you have any favorites
     
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  2. TongoRad

    TongoRad Poo-Bah (2,843) Jun 3, 2004 New Jersey
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    Does rye count? Because there's nothing quite like a rustic amber rye lager!
     
  3. bret27

    bret27 Meyvn (1,304) Mar 10, 2009 California
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    It seems like Monlight is doing it. Side of Rice, Rice lager recently and Old Combine with a bunch of different grains.
     
  4. jonphisher

    jonphisher Disciple (375) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    Kane brewing in NJ brews a beer called coastal plain. It is brewed with two heirloom corn varieties, grown in NJ. Of the lagers I’ve had from them it’s my favorite. Adds a cool subtle sweetness and the fact that they locally source it makes it all the better to me. I wish it was a regular offering, seems it’s only once a year or so then brew it. edited to add description:

    “Our version of a pre-prohibition Vienna-style lager, brewed with New Jersey grown two-row and six-row barley, a small amount of Vienna malt, and two different types of New Jersey grown corn—Stowell’s Evergreen and Bloody Butcher from our friends at Rabbit Hill malthouse.
     
  5. Apathetiq

    Apathetiq Aspirant (253) Sep 10, 2012 Massachusetts
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    Haha, I posted about a triple decocted Kent Falls lager earlier today made with Endeavor barley, also called "winter 2row." A handful of similar brews have been popped up here in New England and it's very exiting. The power of the Beer and Agriculture connection can and should be used to affirm the regenerative agriculture movement. It's gonna happen, especially with the rise of 'farm brewing' licenses; a cluster of breweries can create demand out of thin air.

    Unpopular opinion: Beer is closer to the land than wine

    I can second Rye, and have also seen a couple with oats, spelt, and emmer. More please.
     
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  6. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (1,598) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    Heck ya rye counts, wish I saw more rye lagers

    Oh cool I hadn't heard of those. May have to cue up a moonlight order
     
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  7. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,107) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    When Pabst revived the Hawaiian brand Primo, they created a recipe that included Hawaiian cane sugar - a very rare example of a US brand listing sugar as an ingredient and using it as a selling point.
    [​IMG]
    Flying Fish used wild rice in its Exit Series #16 (seems like they weren't the first, either - some MN brewery also brewed one. "Wild rice" isn't really rice, but it's still a "true" adjunct).

    Someone brewed a beer with blue corn, too (or I'm confusing it with corn chips :grin:).
     
    #7 jesskidden, Oct 12, 2020
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2020
  8. BruChef

    BruChef Initiate (174) Nov 8, 2009 New York

    Just drank an excellent dry hopped Japanese rice lager called Tiny Little Sticks by Proclamation Brewing co. It was one of the most unique smelling/tasting beers I’ve had in a while.
     
  9. HorseheadsHophead

    HorseheadsHophead Poo-Bah (2,231) Sep 15, 2014 New York
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    Mikkeller made a Helles-style lager with oats that was pretty good. The oats weren't particularly noticeable but the mouthfeel was a little bit creamier than your typical Helles. A rye kellerbier would be great.
     
  10. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (1,598) Mar 12, 2013 California
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  11. HorseheadsHophead

    HorseheadsHophead Poo-Bah (2,231) Sep 15, 2014 New York
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  12. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (2,584) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    I like rye beers, I’d be in on rye lagers too, and I’m ok with exploring different hop combos too. Why not? Not everything has to be traditional.
     
  13. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,778) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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  14. Sheppard

    Sheppard Meyvn (1,328) Mar 16, 2013 Virginia
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    Maybe my favorite beer in Virginia right now is a "Farmhouse Lager" from a brewery that focuses on using regional grain, Wheatland Spring. Here's the description for Corn Crib:
     
  15. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,107) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    According to their website:
    ...but Straub distribution (and freshness :grimacing:) has always been spotty in eastern PA for the 40 years or so I've been buying it.

    (I was once told by an employee of a Scranton area retail distributor that they never sold it, when 10 years previously I and friends bought multiple cases from them in their old building - an easy on-off exit on I-81 - during back 'n' forth trips from NJ to the NYS Southern Tier :astonished:).

    Damn, look at all the flavored stuff coming out of Straub. Kinda weird, but if it keeps them in business...
     
  16. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,778) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Straub used to have a Eastern Region sales rep (her last name was Coopersmith) and I had her business card from meeting here at a beer festival. When I was looking to buy one of the Straub seasonal/specialty beers I would e-mail her and in less than 24 hours she would reply and let me know where the closest retailer to me had the product. Unfortunately Straub laid her off a couple of years ago and now I have no idea where their non-regular products are anymore.

    Since you mentioned this beer will be out soon (November) I will contact Straub and ask where I can but 1872 Lager. Maybe they will respond to my e-mail?

    I have tried several times in the past to get answers from their local Wholesale Distributor but they never responded to my e-mail queries.

    Cheers!
     
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  17. FBarber

    FBarber Poo-Bah (4,061) Mar 5, 2016 Illinois
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    I've seen a few of those ...

    A local brewery here in Chicago - Cruz Blanca - brewed a "red" AAL, Fade Away, with local IL grown red corn
     
  18. champ103

    champ103 Poo-Bah (4,850) Sep 3, 2007 Texas
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  19. jonphisher

    jonphisher Disciple (375) Aug 9, 2015 New Jersey
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    How red was it? The Kane one I mentioned uses bloody butcher corn which is red but it in no way changed the color to red. If anything it was a smidge darker than gold. The color is only on the outside of the kernel so I’m guessing it couldn’t have been that red unless they really used a lot of corn. I’m just curious really. Thanks.
     
  20. FBarber

    FBarber Poo-Bah (4,061) Mar 5, 2016 Illinois
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    Caveat - I did not personally drink the beer, but in the photos I saw online it does appear to be darker:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  21. unlikelyspiderperson

    unlikelyspiderperson Poo-Bah (1,598) Mar 12, 2013 California
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    I had a grissette that fonta flora brewed with bloody butcher corn and it had just a little.blush to it. The red from the corn was probably enhanced by how light colored the rest of the grain bill was. Very pretty beer
     
  22. TongoRad

    TongoRad Poo-Bah (2,843) Jun 3, 2004 New Jersey
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    Does anyone have a solid handle on what a Mexican Lager is supposed to be? Some have lime and some not.

    It seems to me that the no-lime ones are just a way of selling an AAL without explicitly calling it that. They're usually pretty good ones, too. :sunglasses:
     
  23. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,778) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Michael, FWIW that is my opinion here.

    Some folks seem to view Mexican brewed AAL beers (e.g., Corona) as being a premium product and the US craft breweries are 'leveraging' this aspect to brand their AAL beers as being Mexican Lagers (e.g., Sierra Nevada Sierraveza) and thereby pricing them high(er).

    IMO Hamms is a high quality AAL and at less than 15 bucks a 30 pack it is a great deal (again IMO).

    Cheers!
     
  24. TongoRad

    TongoRad Poo-Bah (2,843) Jun 3, 2004 New Jersey
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    Yeah, and Narragansett is not quite that cheap but the same principle applies.
     
  25. HammsMeASAP

    HammsMeASAP Initiate (132) Jun 14, 2012 Minnesota

    There has been quite a few wild rice beers around MN. A few are brown ales which are delicious.
     
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  26. HammsMeASAP

    HammsMeASAP Initiate (132) Jun 14, 2012 Minnesota

    That's a fact though.
     
  27. Singlefinpin

    Singlefinpin Champion (842) Jul 17, 2018 North Carolina
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    Back in the 1970's from 1973-1977 was living in Hawaii, Oahu, and Primo was the only beer I could afford. After it was revived, I found a few six packs in Florida, just as bad as I remembered!
    Unfortunately I think it's come to an end once again.
     
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  28. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (2,584) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    Mason Jar brews one, it’s really good too, no lime. They make a mosaic pils, but the Mexican lager is a different beer, and I suspect their fresh Mexican Lager would be killer in the beach.
     
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  29. Bitterbill

    Bitterbill Poo-Bah (7,416) Sep 14, 2002 Wyoming
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    Odell brewed, in collaboration with Accomplice and the Rib and Chop House, a Mexican Lager that I had 2 pints of. I could not detect any corn and I don't know if there are any adjuncts(beer isn't even listed on their website, also not on the Accomplice website) so I entered it as an American Pale Lager. If it turns out to be an AAL, how I'd find that out I'll never know, it would move up the ranks for the style.
     
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  30. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,778) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    If you are so motivated you could reach out to Odell and ask whether they used any adjuncts (e.g., corn) to brew this beer.

    It doesn't hurt to ask.

    Cheers!
     
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  31. Bitterbill

    Bitterbill Poo-Bah (7,416) Sep 14, 2002 Wyoming
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    Good idea, Jack. I will make it so.
    I just emailed them.
     
    #32 Bitterbill, Oct 13, 2020
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2020
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  32. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (4,778) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
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    Jean-Luc would be proud of you!:slight_smile:

    [​IMG]
     
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  33. CB_Michigan

    CB_Michigan Aspirant (200) Sep 4, 2014 Illinois

    Conrad Seipp's great-great-great-granddaughter partnered with Metropolitan Brewing on Seipp's Extra Pale, a Pre-Prohibition Pilsner using "traditional North American malted barley, corn, and heritage hops varieties" (according to the press release).

    @jesskidden I know I've seen you reference Seipp's as one of the big brewers in the late-1800s. I don't know how close this version is to the original, but it is a very fine beer. Easy-drinking at 4.5% ABV and a solid balance between biscuity malts and an earthy, almost herbal bitterness. Fairly light carbonation makes it a smooth but very flavorful beer.
     
  34. MrOH

    MrOH Meyvn (1,316) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    Both DC Brau and Right Proper have done beers in collaboration with Heurich House (the museum in the house of the owners of DC's pre-prohibition lagers). They're ok, I guess, but when you're paying dang near as much for a 6-pack as you would for a 30-rack of Stroh's, you kinda feel a bit ripped off.

    I would absolutely love to have some sorta rye lager using local grains. I know that New Columbia Distillery uses local rye.
     
  35. jesskidden

    jesskidden Poo-Bah (2,107) Aug 10, 2005 New Jersey
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    Geez, Doug Hurst (brewer/co-owner of Metropolitan), can you be anymore vague about the ingredients? :wink:
    Well, Emilie Lindemann (Foxhead) and Elizabeth Hornung (Phila) both did it - taking over the family breweries during Prohibition and operating them after Repeal, but it does appear that, soon after Conrad's death, Seipp's brewery was merged with a number of other local brewers and maltsters (during the 1890s, the period of "English investors" in the US brewing industry) into the City of Chicago Consolidated Brewing Co., and the Seipp family soon after had no connection to the company. A son, William C. Seipp, had been a VP of the brewing company, but resigned a few years after the merger (the implication of one article being that the Brits forced him out).

    While the pdf claims the brewery "...closed its doors in 1933" it appears that while the company operated up until Repeal as a distributor of near beer and soft drinks, they had stopped brewing (legal non-alcoholic cereal beverage) in the early 1920s, according to some sources.
     
    #36 jesskidden, Oct 13, 2020
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2020
  36. ESHBG

    ESHBG Disciple (342) Jul 30, 2011 Pennsylvania

    I've found over time that I am a fan of corn and rice in beer, as for me it adds a nice flavor and crispness. One of my favorites, especially for the price, is Founders Solid Gold (corn).
     
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  37. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Poo-Bah (1,834) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan
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    AABG Rocket 100 uses corn. It has won a couple GABF Gold's.

    Bow and Arrow in ABQ had Denim Tux, which uses Blue Corn, and was very nice CAP.
     
  38. rgordon

    rgordon Meyvn (1,093) Apr 26, 2012 North Carolina

    Back when Fonta Flora was only at the pub in downtown Morganton I had their beet ale (cannot remember the name). It was a fine and light colored beet red. It was a fine earthy ale well rendered....I really liked it.
     
  39. nc41

    nc41 Poo-Bah (2,584) Sep 25, 2008 North Carolina
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    I love FF beers, but I’m one of those that’s texture and color adverse across a pretty wide spectrum. I don’t eat avocados because they're a sickly green color, and they’re oily as hell. Drinking that blue DIPA on Sunday weirded me out, it was blue, not blueberry blue but weirdly translucent blue when back lit. It tasted like toasted almonds but the color threw me. I’m probably too old to have much more of an open mind, but a blood red beer I probably couldn’t drink.