Ginger Root

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by Hop-Droppen-Roll, Dec 8, 2015.

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  1. Hop-Droppen-Roll

    Hop-Droppen-Roll Initiate (0) Nov 5, 2013 Minnesota

  2. jkn09

    jkn09 Aspirant (275) Oct 17, 2012 Texas

    I used it in a pale ale, but I way overdid the ginger. So be conservative with your usage. A little bit goes a long way.

    Shiner has a summer beer brewed with grapefruit and ginger called Ruby Redbird.
     
  3. Hop-Droppen-Roll

    Hop-Droppen-Roll Initiate (0) Nov 5, 2013 Minnesota

    You think the pale would have been good had you dialed back the ginger?
     
  4. jkn09

    jkn09 Aspirant (275) Oct 17, 2012 Texas

    I think so. I could taste that there was potential, but the ginger was so strong. FWIW, it has faded a bit and tastes better, but it's been 3 months or so.
    I used maybe 2 quarter sized knobs for a 1.75 gal batch (random size, but it's what I had on hand).
     
  5. Hop-Droppen-Roll

    Hop-Droppen-Roll Initiate (0) Nov 5, 2013 Minnesota

    When did you add it? Secondary? For how long?...
     
  6. baumdrop

    baumdrop Initiate (90) May 29, 2009 Delaware

    I use ginger root in my holiday ale. I do a ten gallon batch and add 2 oz of freshly grated ginger the last 15 min of the boil. Iit's not overpowering but you can definitely tell there is some in the brew.
     
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  7. Brew_Betty

    Brew_Betty Disciple (394) Jan 5, 2015 Wisconsin

    1oz / 5 gal - noticeable and pleasant
    2oz / 5 gal - fairly strong with a spicy ginger beer finish
    3oz / 5 gal - very strong
    4oz / 5 gal - insane

    boil for 10-15 minutes
    this is for fresh ginger root, not powder

    The flavor does mellow out with time, so the right dose also depends on how long you age the beer before drinking it.
     
  8. Hop-Droppen-Roll

    Hop-Droppen-Roll Initiate (0) Nov 5, 2013 Minnesota

    Awesome, thanks! Do you grate the ginger root as well?
     
  9. Brew_Betty

    Brew_Betty Disciple (394) Jan 5, 2015 Wisconsin

    I slice them thin like ginger coins. Grating works, but the shreds would clog my plate chiller.
     
  10. Lukass

    Lukass Savant (989) Dec 16, 2012 Ohio

    I used 3 oz. of candied ginger in an imperial pumpkin ale this past fall. Just tossed it in the boil in the last 5 min. I'm with Brew Betty though in that it can easily be overdone. I found 2-3 oz towards the end of the boil to work well, and it's not overpowering. Some people are more sensitive to spice than others though, so it's really a matter of preference. Granted, I used candied ginger, which isn't as strong as straight-up ginger root.
     
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  11. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Devotee (493) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    Used 4 oz of boiled sliced grinder root in a exceedingly bitter IPA. Actually tasted pretty good after 3 months in the bottle.
    I added the boiled ginger to the secondary for 2 weeks
     
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  12. KurtE

    KurtE Initiate (0) Nov 19, 2012 Illinois

    I read that using ginger in the secondary will give you more spice in your beer, and less "ginger" flavor. has anyone added ginger to secondary, and did you boil it first or do anything to sanitize it? I ask because I just brewed a holiday beer and my brew buddy was insistent that we add it to the secondary not to the boil, I am skeptical to say the least.
     
  13. Brew_Betty

    Brew_Betty Disciple (394) Jan 5, 2015 Wisconsin

    The post before yours answers your question. If you did nothing to sanitize the ginger, it could infect the beer, but probably won't.

    Ginger in the boil provides both spicy heat and ginger flavor. The heat smooths out with age. The ginger flavor seems to get better with age. Since I've been happy with ginger in the boil, I have never tried it post boil.
     
  14. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,911) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Society

    It's not an unusual ingredient in spiced Belgian ales, but the spicing in those can be subtle, beneath the threshold of positive ID ("mmm what was that?"). It is more prominent in some holiday style ales and lagers (think Sam Adams Winter Lager and Fezziwig). I had one ginger-spiced ale in a brew pub that overwhelmed, to the point of undrinkability. I would lean adding half of what you think is insufficient during the boil and if it turns out you were right, add more post fermentation as a tincture, or maybe boil some with your priming sugar.
     
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