1. Introducing the Respect Beer® Society. Upgrading your account to a Society membership entitles you to more than a dozen awesome perks, from discounts, to ad-free browsing, extended users stats, and much more. Join today.
  2. BEER FEST ALERT: Don't miss FUNK Boston: A Wild & Sour Beer Fest on June 14-15!

"Hype beast"-ing in craft beer

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by Beer_Stan, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. Beer_Stan

    Beer_Stan Initiate (78) Mar 15, 2014 California
    Trader

    I know a lot of beer drinkers come from a variety of backgrounds none more valid than any other, but I've recently come to notice the ever growing trend in Hype Beasts taking over the craft beer scene more and more. Those who line up for all the latest releases, dragging along random family members to mule for them, fill up the brewery taking shots "for the gram" while their beer gets warmer, discussing not the value of the beer in it's taste but the value it has in trades. It's not enough to not know anything about the beer but its as if knowing anything about it is the furthest thing from their mind outside of what they can get for it. For a brewery I'm sure this is great for business as the dollars come pouring in but what does that mean for the ever amorphous culture of craft beer? Have we already seen the shift in brewing trends where beers are being brewed not for the integrity of innovation and taste but with the sole purpose of being traded? Are other great yet not so traded beers and breweries going to suffer as a result? Let me know what you think?
     
  2. bbtkd

    bbtkd Poo-Bah (2,285) Sep 20, 2015 South Dakota
    Society Trader

    There are still plenty of craft enthusiasts refusing to jump on the hype wagon and a majority of breweries don't play that game either. But yes, some breweries such as Toppling Goliath with KBBS are artificially limiting availability to drive up costs and hype. I don't believe KBBS has unicorn hair, phoenix feathers, or dragon's teeth - so there is no technical reason they couldn't mass-brew KBBS and actually distribute it.
     
  3. Prince_Casual

    Prince_Casual Disciple (305) Nov 3, 2012 District of Columbia
    Trader

    To be totally honest, beer is no better (or worse) than other collectible hobbies. Bourbon is (100x) worse than beer. Collecting records is really bad. Concert tickets are a little different but scalping tickets is the original "flip." In music gear- guitars themselves are so expensive they never had that "sell for double what I bought it for" mentality, but the handwired amplifiers and handmade stompboxes had a huge "collector"/"fllipper" thing going on for 10yrs+, although common sense seems to have returned.

    Look up a guy who makes "eurorack" synthesizer modules named "Cwejman." He releases modules, that are really not much different than things from other brands make thousands of that can be bought off the shelf for $200-300, yet his stuff (with the boutique look and genuine scarcity since he makes dozens of modules per year, not hundreds or thousands like big companies) has a massive waitlist, and every release gets destroyed by bots and flippers, just because his $300 module can be resold for $1000 or whatever.

    People just like rare shit and thinking they are cool. And people think they can get in the flipping game, no matter what it is, and make "an easy hundred." Best is just to laugh, never buy over face value/msrp, and move on.

    --
    On instagram, I gues because I follow some cigar stores/ whisky companies,I get recommended these series of pictures that are presumably rich fucks with no class, posing a $25 stick, 1 or more $300+ bottle of scotch or rare bourbon, and often, bizarrely, a handgun. The cigar is never let, the bottle is never open, and the gun, well it's just sitting there... but apparently this is a thing to pose you expensive shit and do hashtags. In skateboarding we used to all this being a poseur but apparently some people never knew that was lame af. Some people put their lolRolex in the frame too. It's like a who's who of classless people from LA or Chicago.
     
  4. Beer_Stan

    Beer_Stan Initiate (78) Mar 15, 2014 California
    Trader

    No I totally know what hype beasts are and their motivations for running amok just to brag and induce others with FOMO but I was saying as far as how it affects the current beer industry. How much influence do the hype beasts have over what beers a brewery will make, is this already happening and how will this affect what beers are available to the non hype centric drinker? I feel like breweries are creating "whales" instead of letting the market decide what a "whale" is. I wanted to see if it wasn't just me who saw that.
     
    Prince_Casual likes this.
  5. Oktoberfiesta

    Oktoberfiesta Aspirant (256) Nov 16, 2013 New Mexico

    Good post. I'm of the age I grew up around Jordan brand, and Nike SB sneakers. It's of the same similar lineage of BF electronic sale waiting and Apple iPhone release waiting. Some of these folks grew away from the electronics and jumped right into beer. It's a way of life for some.

    People just inherently like stuff that is bigger than themselves. It's not fun if there is no line and you're walking into a store solo for a 4 pack of beer. Maybe it's the drama or perceived community aspect of everyone trying to obtain the same items

    During hurricane and storm prep, we see some buy up all the water and snow shovels and try to flip them. Having something many more want makes people feel important. Most of their lives are materialistic and lacking of any true value.

    This has the trading cards crash of mid 2000s all over again. If 30 breweries all produce something super limited, you better have the people ready to drink it. If perceived trade value ever drops, some may not even wait in line. As much as these guys are making, I want to say it's still very fragile.
     
  6. stevepat

    stevepat Devotee (498) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Trader

    The basis of the emergence of craft beer seems to be a demand for fresh, tasty, and varied beer. Most breweries are trying to provide one or more of those. The brewers that chase the hype will live and die by those whims. The brewers that make a tasty spread of styles will have a core customer base and as long as they pay attention to their sales and control production properly they will have a long life.
    Like others have said, this aspect exists in all consumables, it annoys the die hard fans (I have sat through many a rant against whatever the hip brand in their hobby is). We will survive, I don't worry about my access to any styles disappearing anytime soon
     
    chrismattlin and Beer_Stan like this.
  7. islay

    islay Aspirant (237) Jan 6, 2008 Minnesota

    I get the impression that this phenomenon, while certainly still present, is on the wane in many areas of the country. Yes, of course some breweries brew certain beers primarily to generate hype. Yes, many breweries employ artificial scarcity (unnecessarily low volume and well-below-market prices) to generate queuing and the buzz that comes with it (as well as to avoid silly but reputation-sullying accusations of price-gouging). Yes, this has resulted in a lot of stupid beer for people more interested in the scene than in the beer. But trading seems to have been receding as so many markets now have so many options, the cultural tide seems to be starting to turn toward mockery of (not just complaining about) these practices (based on comments I see in these forums and that I hear in real life from fellow craft beer fans), and I notice much less hype for new releases than I did a couple of years ago. I'd give you personal anecdotal evidence about the length of lines for releases, but I'm proud to say I can't recall ever standing in one. That said, I've heard from local industry contacts that the lines are shorter than they used to be.

    On the one hand, from a personal preferences perspective, I think this relaxation of hype is a wonderful development. Pardon the vernacular, but that shit is dumb as hell. I do, however, think it may portend a falloff in demand for craft beer. Without a scene, the scenesters will disappear, and the scenesters are a big chunk of the customer base of many of the most widely discussed (i.e., most highly hyped) breweries.
     
    storm72, chrismattlin, Junior and 2 others like this.
  8. stevepat

    stevepat Devotee (498) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Trader

    How much of the customer base it's really scenesters though? Maybe it's way way different than I experience but I have a hard time imagining more than 10% of the crowd being there for just the "scene"
     
    maximum12, tinoynk and Junior like this.
  9. laketang

    laketang Meyvn (1,042) Mar 22, 2015 Illinois
    Society

    Some people just like that aspect of craft beer , but it's not for me.i don't buy beer to trade it , I buy it to drink it. To each their own I guess.
     
  10. surfcaster

    surfcaster Crusader (755) Apr 20, 2013 North Carolina
    Society Trader

    Agreed.

    Perhaps I am not lining up or just tone deaf (or just shooing off lawns) but the "craze" seems to have waned considerably--at least in these parts. I am not sure if the muling, etc described for things like KBBS is as much to get beer but more to score a cheap buck like ticket scalping.

    When such behavior focuses on a fast buck and not a desire for the product, I suspect it is the leading edge of a "slide" which I feel we are in.

    However, solid and wonderful beer appears here to stay and if that is what is left over, fine with me.

    OK-- resume play on the lawn.
     
    storm72 and herrburgess like this.
  11. oldbean

    oldbean Aspirant (288) Jun 30, 2005 Massachusetts

    Seems to have almost completely run its course in New England. Alchemist just kicked off distribution to all of VT, which feels a little bit like a bookend to this particular era of beer culture.
     
  12. Junior

    Junior Zealot (539) May 23, 2015 Michigan
    Society Trader

    It may be a small percentage of people but it is a much higher percentage of sales dollars. These ‘scenesters’ and hype beasts, by definition, are buying the high end stuff.
     
  13. islay

    islay Aspirant (237) Jan 6, 2008 Minnesota

    By "scenesters," I mean people who are interested in the cultural trappings of craft beer more than beer as a drinkable beverage and who would be likely largely to abandon their consumption of craft beer if the culture around craft beer significantly shifted, faded, or became uncool and the social advantages to consuming craft beer dissipated. I don't believe that the rather sudden and massive surge of interest in craft beer in the twenty-teens came solely or even primarily from people discovering en masse that they prefer the flavors of craft beer. Indeed, the flavor shifts we've seen in recent years ("The Great Sweetening") suggest that the flavors that had been associated with craft beer were less than ideal for those newer customers. I think, rather, that craft beer, for whatever reason, was able to capture the zeitgeist and consequently extend its appeal well beyond people who wanted intense versions of classic beer flavors to people who wanted intense versions of trendy cultural experiences. Hence the flood of hip, young people (no longer mainly middle-aged, fat, male nerds) into taprooms and the emergence of queuing among those with the strongest desire to demonstrate their fealty to their newfound subculture of choice.

    It depends on the brewery, but, in general, I suspect the proportion of scenesters among craft beer drinkers is well over 10%, especially in urban areas. 30%? 40%? 50%? 60%? More? I'm thinking of a certain brewery in my area where it seems to be the vast majority (80%? 90%?). I think a lot of individuals who entered this hobby in the last few years are not cognizant of or in denial about what motivated them in the first place and what drives their continued interest. Drinking historically is a very social activity, and there's nothing inherently wrong with drinking for social reasons rather than for the enjoyment of the beverage. I dare say that the vast majority of alcohol consumed throughout history was done more despite its flavor than because of it. It does behoove the industry to understand what's really driving its customers' buying habits, in order to cater to that customer base (such as with beer that doesn't taste like beer, helpful because so many of those customers don't much like the taste of beer), for marketing purposes (the hipper the better), and when considering major business strategy decisions such as expansion (probably not a good idea in most instances given the reliance on such a fickle customer base).
     
  14. thedaveofbeer

    thedaveofbeer Initiate (147) Mar 25, 2016 Massachusetts
    Trader

    I don't know about that-an upstart brewery in Fitchburg MA, River Styx, just released 22 dollar 4 packs that sold out in a day. Lots of people are clamoring for these expensive beers with offers to trade other hyped breweries above $4$. hype is still rolling.
     
  15. Prince_Casual

    Prince_Casual Disciple (305) Nov 3, 2012 District of Columbia
    Trader

    You're right- you could say that about pretty much anyone who doesn't do silent releases and / or have a club that "anyone" can join (so I'm not counting clubs that have lotteries or other exclusion to join).

    There is a brewery in Northern VA who does sporadic BA stout releases, and yesterday, there were the usual people asking "how long is the line?"... "why don't you guys just do silent releases?"

    The response is "zomg did you see how long the line was outside our brewery !!!111!!!!?

    Being a national or regional brewer may be risky, but having your entire operation require people to show up at your brewery to buy $20 4x16s, I just don't see that being sustainable in the 5yr window, for anyone.
     
  16. oldbean

    oldbean Aspirant (288) Jun 30, 2005 Massachusetts

    Yeah I mean people still play Pokemon Go, too. Crazes don't disappear, they just find their level in the overall cultural ecosystem. Five years ago, if someone wanted to do a New England beer vacation, there'd be this whole crazy list of warnings about how Tree House has been limited growler fills to three, don't go to Hill Farmstead on a Saturday because the line is two and a half hours, tracking the Heady truck... that stuff is by and large over. You can still find a line if you want, but it's much more the exception than the rule these days.
     
  17. MistaRyte

    MistaRyte Devotee (460) Jan 14, 2008 Virginia
    Trader

    I'm glad somebody posted this just as Smartmouth released "Saturday Morning" last week.

    Starter info: SM has had no "hype" releases... ever... in its brief craft beer existence. Anything not a flagship I can walk in day of release, walk out 5 minutes later.

    Cue Saturday Morning... a "Lucky Charms" beer which I believe is basically just their Game On with marshmallow added. Granted there have been other brefus cereal beers in this state before (Strangeways has had a Berlinner like this for 5 year at least). I was out of the country at the time, but apparently this beer was HYPE-D up, like ridiculous. Believe it made Tonite Show/Jimmy Kimmel/whatever.

    I drive to Chelsea (Norfolk neighborhood for Smartmouth) 10 of noon (SM starting time). Traffic is miserable, I assumed there was a 5K/10K/race I wasn't aware of. No, it was all for this beer. There was a line 400-450 people deep waiting to grab 4 packs.

    Immediately I said "F**k this" and just went beer shopping at TW/bottleBOX. The hype beast is real, my friend. This time, I think it was the fact this beer "made mainstream TV" that drove it home.
     
    HopsAreDaMan likes this.
  18. bubseymour

    bubseymour Poo-Bah (2,368) Oct 30, 2010 Maryland
    Trader

    Nature will take its course. Hype without quality doesn't sustain long at all in the beer world but just during the shiny/new period. Seriously, are there any brewers putting out beers for over 2 years with under a 4.2 overall rating of certain beers still sustaining lines for re-releases? I don't think so (but if there are any, would love to know). It takes really special beers (scaricity but also quality) to keep people clamoring for them over and over. Once enough people taste the inferior beers, the trade interest will wain, and the lines will dwindle.
     
  19. stevepat

    stevepat Devotee (498) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Trader

    @islay, if your assessments are accurate then I feel bad for your area's beer scene. I suspect you may be mistaking some hipster's with beer scenesters but I can't really know obviously. I think that there are many people who drink beer from local breweries without being a total beer nerd. I don't think these people are really on the verge of abandoning beer consumption and they are also not the people at the big hype releases. I think that the big beer lines are probably a semi endangered species because I could see your estimate of upwards of 80% people just there for the IG pics/secondary value/general social status being close but I have never been in a brewery where I looked around and thought to myself 'I bet most of these people don't even like beer'
     
    ManBearPat and tinoynk like this.
  20. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,858) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    How prevalent is the above beer scene in your area? Can you please name breweries? How long are the lines (e.g., 2 hours to buy a 4-pack)?

    As others have discussed in this thread in my area this practice is on the wane. If you had started this thread 2 years ago I would be in agreement with you here.

    Cheers!
     
  21. islay

    islay Aspirant (237) Jan 6, 2008 Minnesota

    Significant swaths of California certainly are decades ahead of Minnesota and most of the rest of the country from the standpoints of craft beer normalization and longterm integration into the broader culture (as opposed to being a mere passing fad). I don't know if you hail from such an area. I've traveled a fair amount in recent years, invariably checking into the local craft beer scene each time, and I can assure you that the phenomenon I describe is widespread though not necessarily universal.

    What I'm getting at is that a lot of people these days who frequent taprooms and otherwise involve themselves in the craft beer scene are largely motivated by the atmosphere, the socializing, and the fun of that involvement, all of which depend on an adequate level of hipness to be sustained. If their friends stop going, and the vibe at the breweries descends from fun to dull, will they continue to visit for the beer alone? Will they continue to seek the newest releases if the buzz has died down and nobody wants to talk about those beers anymore or will "like" their social media posts of their latest #bosspour?

    The queuers and truck-chasers mostly are an extreme manifestation of this phenomenon of people involved in craft beer mainly for the cultural trappings. They're usually trying to be the coolest guys at the bottle share. Will they continue standing in those lines when nobody gives a crap about whalez any longer or the bottle shares stop happening at all? I doubt it.

    Why do we see waves of hype for individual beers, and then eventually demand plummets? Is it because collective tastes have shifted or because the hype in its own right was a large part of the original appeal? Admittedly, sometimes the answer is that production has increased to satisfy the demand, eliminating the shortage, or that newer, "better" beers have eclipsed the formerly obsessed-over originals.

    When the cultural tides turn and craft beer returns to its -- I contend -- natural status as an unhip counterculture or an afterthought (as opposed to a highly buzzed about arm of mainstream culture), I expect a lot of those folks* significantly to curtail their spending on craft beer. That may not be pretty, especially for the breweries that have developed or pivoted to a dependency on such customers.

    * The "scenesters," as I call them, and, for the record, I'm using that as a descriptive term, not a pejorative.
     
  22. tinoynk

    tinoynk Initiate (68) Sep 25, 2010 New York
    Trader

    Geez god forbid people go to a public drinking establishment to socialize and have fun in a nice environment.

    And since when is trying to go out and have fun "hip"? I guess we should all stay inside and be dour because otherwise you're a hipster?
     
    maximum12, TheGent, Junior and 3 others like this.
  23. stevepat

    stevepat Devotee (498) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Trader

    Hmm interesting perspective. It seems that you have a much more apocalyptic outlook than I do with regards the future of beer in the US. Where I live in CA there is a total absence of hype beers and generally the local beers are between bad and solid, nothing that I would really consider fantastic. However, quality beer is very well integrated into the local culture. There are not many places where you can get food but aren't able to get a good beer. There are multiple bars, including divey ones, that carry a solid spread of local/regional beer options.
    I imagine that as the hypey aspects of craft beer die down we will be largely unaffected. There are currently no beer lines and no trade bait. Nothing that people travel for or rave about. And yet all of the breweries are regularly busy. The people I see there are usually locals, some have a deep appreciation for beer, some just like 1 of the beers the brewery makes, some are drinking kombucha. Then there are the travelers, often stopping as much for a meal as a beer. I don't really see any reason why that would all suddenly disappear.
    In any case, it should be an interesting few years for the beer scene
     
    islay likes this.
  24. islay

    islay Aspirant (237) Jan 6, 2008 Minnesota

    Again, descriptive, not pejorative. As I wrote earlier, alcoholic beverages as a social lubricant are the norm; alcoholic beverages as a hobby for connoisseurs is what's unusual. I'll flip the question on you: Given that there's nothing inherently* wrong with enjoying beer primarily because of the social scene around it, what's the problem with pointing out that many people do exactly that? Why must we pretend that everyone we encounter at a brewery or bottle shop is there for the love of the liquid alone?

    * I do think the scenesters' influence can at times be deleterious, but it produces positive externalities that benefit the connoisseurs as well. It's a classic mixed bag.
     
    chrismattlin likes this.
  25. Beer_Stan

    Beer_Stan Initiate (78) Mar 15, 2014 California
    Trader

    Monkish, Bottle logic, Russian River, Moksa just to rattle off a few
     
    JackHorzempa likes this.
  26. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,858) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Do you personally have experience with the lines (or have read about them)? How long is a line typically at Russian River for example? Is this a regular (e.g., weekly) event?

    Cheers!
     
  27. Beer_Stan

    Beer_Stan Initiate (78) Mar 15, 2014 California
    Trader

    I thought Russian River would have been a given what with people driving all the way up the coast calling every store on the way asking if anyone has any Pliny but, If you look up monkish brewing or any of their associated hashtags you'll see what I mean in terms of the hype shifting the culture or the very brewery itself. The story of Monkish especially plays into what I was asking about because they are a small production Brewery that used to make innovative Belgian style beers exclusively as their namesake suggests, they learned how to make some hazy ipas right around when the craze was coming out to the west coast and now its primarily what they make. The moment they say on social media that they have a can release which is sporadic, people literally stop what they are doing and go line up down a long drive way and around the corner for it. Which is big business for them sure but I wonder what will become of them and other breweries like them who have built a tower of babel on shifting sands.
     
  28. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,858) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    There is a brewery which is the functional equivalent of Monkish about 15 minutes from me: Tired Hands in Ardmore, PA. They conduct weekly can releases (every Wednesday) of Juicy/Hazy hoppy beers. If we were having this discussion a couple of years ago I would be reporting about lines that took about 3 hours for folks to purchase their beers. A couple of years ago those prices would be around 16 bucks for a 'NEIPA' 4-pack and today they are $18+ and for some 'special' beers even over 25 bucks for a 4-pack. But the line situation in 2019 is drastically different. I have read were folks have purchased their beers with only a 5-10 minute wait. If you want to see how Monkish will be in the future perhaps follow how Tired Hands is today?

    Cheers!
     
  29. WSchmidt

    WSchmidt Initiate (75) Jul 3, 2011 Virginia

    Good thread. It's always worth bringing this up every couple of years. Where I live (Northern VA), the hype train has definitely slowed down. I gave up on Aslin for a few years, but these days I can just swing by at 3:30 on a weekday and buy as much as I want from them (which is not much, given their prices).

    I also travel a lot, a rarely see the insane lines that were once common a few years ago. I credit this to increased competition--more breweries are producing good beer. Personally, I'm done with lines beyond a reasonable (15 minute) threshold. It's just beer.
     
  30. bubseymour

    bubseymour Poo-Bah (2,368) Oct 30, 2010 Maryland
    Trader

    I've always been a huge fan of Aslin beers, and still find them best in the NOVA/DC/MD area, but yeah the $16-$20 4 packs for me are a 1-2 times a year treat and not a regular drinking staple. But have the lines died down because of production increases, people getting tired of the NEIPAs on the regular, or are there other brewers in the NOVA/DC area making beers on par with them? If so let me know, I haven't found them yet.
     
  31. VoodooBear

    VoodooBear Devotee (417) Aug 25, 2012 Puerto Rico
    Trader

    I wouldn't say the entire industry has shifted. But there's a lot of breweries popping up specializing in NEIPAs, pastry stouts, etc. Some older breweries have tried canning their (old) stuff in 16 oz. cans and sticking 12 oz. bottle labels on them. Some people are trying to do the craziest shit they can with beer, which is innovation, sure, but innovation to be controversial and generate hype. I haven't seen any trade specific beers being made but Magnify's "Trade Proof" did make me chuckle a bit.

    Honestly, that depends on the integrity of the people doing the brewing. Are they going to keep making their great beers even if they don't generate as much hype? Are they moving their production towards, not so good, but more hyped up styles? It all depends.

    As someone who's lived (and arguably is currently living) through the sneaker/streetwear hypebeast tsunami, the Funko Pop! hypebeast tsunami, the "stance"/"fast and furious" car culture era, etc.; I hope this thing blows by on the beer scene too. Thankfully there's so much beer available these days, it's getting easier and easier to avoid the hypebeasts and hyped releases without feeling like you're missing out on something huge.
     
    Junior and Beer_Stan like this.
  32. ypsifly

    ypsifly Meyvn (1,034) Sep 22, 2004 Michigan

    Its still alive in the Detroit area, but our beer scene has always been several steps behind those in other places in the country. Ascension can drop a thin, overly sweet pastry stout but because the bottle count was extremely limited the local neckbeards were practically offering up their first born children to get one. When Founders released BA Imp Stout at the brewery a lot of people got shut out and the online butthurt was through the roof with the resulting attempts at manipulating secondary pricing being painfully obvious.
     
    islay likes this.
  33. IPAExpert69

    IPAExpert69 Initiate (178) Aug 2, 2017 Pennsylvania
    Trader

    Never thought I'd see this phrase on BeerAdvocate but I digress. I just think there is always going to be a relatively liquid, neck bearded hipster class that will buy basically anything that's "limited edition" or a "one-off". It applies to the dumbass Supreme shirts people spend thousands on and it applies to beer.
     
    storm72 and Beer_Stan like this.
  34. Beer_Stan

    Beer_Stan Initiate (78) Mar 15, 2014 California
    Trader

    I think I'm just seeing the "gotta catch em all" generation edging into in craft beer, come a long way since POGS and Pokemon/MtG card sets. People who wait in lines for Jordans will inevitably wait in line for beer even if they don't know what it is, just has to seem valuable and FOMO enough which I understand. I was just seeing if others were noticing the influence of these types in terms of what beers were being brewed to support this clientele if at all.
     
  35. Beer_Stan

    Beer_Stan Initiate (78) Mar 15, 2014 California
    Trader

  36. WSchmidt

    WSchmidt Initiate (75) Jul 3, 2011 Virginia

    For NEIPA's, Aslin still produces the most consistently good beers in the area. But FWIW, I liked the last two Ocelot triple IPA's (Talking Backwards and Bigger Cat) as much, if not more, than Aslin's beers, and they were $4 cheaper than what Aslin would charge. I also like Solace's beers, but they aren't at the same level as Aslin. They are cheaper, though, and still pretty good.
     
    bubseymour likes this.
  37. dennis3951

    dennis3951 Champion (871) Mar 6, 2008 New Jersey

    Do these hyped beers ever got drunk? Or is this just a circle jerk of beer traders?
     
  38. bubseymour

    bubseymour Poo-Bah (2,368) Oct 30, 2010 Maryland
    Trader

    The beer traders get together for "bottle shares" where the hype beers get consumed in the ulitimate in-person show off session to one-up the other with who brought the most hyped beer to the party. Translation, yes its pretty much a circle jerk.
     
  39. bubseymour

    bubseymour Poo-Bah (2,368) Oct 30, 2010 Maryland
    Trader

    Nice I'll have to revisit Ocelot then. Been at least 3-4 years ago since I last visited there (at that time I didn't think too much of their beers).
     
  40. Beer_Stan

    Beer_Stan Initiate (78) Mar 15, 2014 California
    Trader

    LMAO