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Ingredient Preference Help

Discussion in 'Beer Talk' started by OakGuy, Feb 4, 2019.

  1. JrGtr

    JrGtr Disciple (376) Apr 13, 2006 Massachusetts

    Look, if you've shut off hop pellets (which are just cones that are shredded, mixed and compressed into a more homogenous, easy to ship, handle, test and use form (the only thing pellets are harder to handle is filtering from your finished beer)) you've turned your list from most breweries to very very few. Certain ones will do whole-hop brews as special occasions, especially wet-hop / fresh hop beers around harvest time, but very few will use exclusively whole cones in all beers.
    Like others, I think you may be ignoring the forest for the tree. Using pellets doesn't mean they don't care about what they're making.
    I would recommend visiting some breweries nearby. Talk to the folks there, and see if they can assuage your concerns about ingredients.
    Like I said earlier, most craft breweries use only the 4 main ingredients, malted barley, hops, water, and yeast in the majority of their beers. Certain beers might get other items, like oats or lactose for stouts, fruit or other flavors for others, and weirder experimental beers.
    Using your example earlier, no brewer would use Froot Loops in a beer without advertising the hell out of it - being something that one would never expect in beer they won't just sneak it in.
     
  2. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,861) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Yeah man!

    [​IMG]
     
    chipawayboy, Junior and PapaGoose03 like this.
  3. MistaRyte

    MistaRyte Devotee (460) Jan 14, 2008 Virginia
    Trader

    If its an Apple Cinnamon Stout... why nit use Apple Cinnamon cheerios to desecrate your bottle?

    Fruit Loops... they belong on NEIPAs
     
  4. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,861) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Why not!?!:slight_smile:

    Cheers!
     
  5. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,285) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Trader

    Those aren't fruit loops, they're apple Jack's.
     
  6. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,861) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Ah, same difference!?!:stuck_out_tongue:
     
  7. MistaRyte

    MistaRyte Devotee (460) Jan 14, 2008 Virginia
    Trader

    Dang... makes sense then.

    I propose we coat oatmeal stouts in oatmeal and chili stouts in chili pepper.
     
    SFACRKnight and JackHorzempa like this.
  8. Ranbot

    Ranbot Zealot (562) Nov 27, 2006 Pennsylvania

    This discussion has all the hallmarks of pseudoscience, but for beer... Preconceived notions, questionable research, demands for labeling, incorrect use/understanding of industry terms and practices, dismisses/ignores technical or scientific explanations, and personal opinion trumps everything.
     
  9. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,861) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Society

    Randy, I wish that I could provide to you more than one like here. You absolutely nailed it.

    Cheers to you!
     
    SFACRKnight and Ranbot like this.
  10. Claude-Irishman

    Claude-Irishman Zealot (579) Jun 4, 2015 New Jersey
    Society

    A fan of Rheinheitsgebot act- Cool- I like it myself personally- Yeast was not yet synthesized in 1516
     
  11. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Meyvn (1,405) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    I have no idea what that means.

    Brewers knew that beer was made with the skimmed foam, barm, or residue from brewing. The microscope wasn't invented yet. It wasn't until Pasteur in the 19th century that yeast's contribution was understood.
     
  12. Claude-Irishman

    Claude-Irishman Zealot (579) Jun 4, 2015 New Jersey
    Society

    That is what I said- Yeast was not "invented" in 1516- or discovered whatever your preference- Also synthesized means man made
     
    PapaGoose03 likes this.
  13. HopsCraftHouse

    HopsCraftHouse Initiate (54) Mar 18, 2016 New York


    Look at your German import selection near you. They should follow the Reinheursgebot laws. If you are looking for a good beer that is in the US I would recommend calling some local breweries. They will talk to you about their beer and are usually willing to have complete transparency with their local consumer.
     
  14. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Meyvn (1,405) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    I'm aware of what synthesized means. Yeast is naturally occurring.

    The true function was not known, but as I said it was used.
     
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  15. Claude-Irishman

    Claude-Irishman Zealot (579) Jun 4, 2015 New Jersey
    Society

    Would be hard to make beer without it -
     
  16. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,285) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Trader

    Yeast is not synthesized. Eugenics may be at play, but yeast is not of man.
     
    hopfenunmaltz, drtth and PapaGoose03 like this.
  17. stevepat

    stevepat Devotee (498) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Trader

    Yeast is heavily modified nowadays though, to the point that some people consider it 'synthetic'. Big industry genetically modifying yeasts to produce all sorts of complex molecules for uses in things like pharmaceuticals.

    I remember some talk a few years back about the CRISPR-9 technology making it much easier and there were murmurs from people worried that we'd start synthesizing all kinds of brewing yeasts
     
  18. hopfenunmaltz

    hopfenunmaltz Meyvn (1,405) Jun 8, 2005 Michigan

    None are in use in brewing. Yet.
     
  19. stevepat

    stevepat Devotee (498) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Trader

    Ya I know. Just thought I'd throw it out there. Potentially very interesting implications for brewing as the tech improves.
    If there are any yeast geneticists in the house any comments on the current state of marker assisted breeding would be gladly received.
     
  20. marquis

    marquis Crusader (764) Nov 20, 2005 United Kingdom (England)

    Genetic modification is simply doing in a lab what happens randomly in nature over a longer time scale.
     
  21. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,285) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado
    Trader

    This technology hasn'made it to the brewing world. Again, brewers yeast is a grand experiment in microbiological eugenics. Specific traits are desired and the organisms that perform in a desired way are perpetuated while those who don't are discarded. I could only imagine how much a pint of pharmaceutical grade beer is going to cost me.
     
    stevepat likes this.
  22. stevepat

    stevepat Devotee (498) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Trader

    Is KBBS pharmaceutical grade?
     
    SFACRKnight likes this.
  23. stevepat

    stevepat Devotee (498) Mar 12, 2013 California
    Trader

    Technically everything is simply something that happens randomly in nature.
    What concerns people about GMO food is when genes from another species are spliced into a food crop.
    The most interesting and exciting thing to me happening with genomic science is what they call marker assisted breeding where they identify the gene sequences they want to be present and then screen young plants and cull any that don't have it. Speeds up the breeding process tremendously and allows breeders to select for traits that are harder to identify by just the senses.
    I'm not sure what is being done to modify yeast but I would imagine it's mostly that, maybe a bit of splicing between yeast species, possibly the introduction of bacterial genetics. Interesting stuff
     
  24. TriggerFingers

    TriggerFingers Disciple (325) Apr 29, 2012 California

    The list of breweries that meet your specifications would be very, very short. It makes more sense from a cost perspective to use hop extracts and malt syrups. Extracts because it increases IBU utilization and cuts down on the vegetative matter in the wort 'soaking up' beer that a brewery could potentially sell. Malt syrups are also beneficial in making significant quantities of higher gravity beers on smaller systems.

    Both of these realities you can learn if you brew your own beer. Actually...have you considered brewing beer at home? It's really the only way, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that you will know for sure exactly what is going into your glass.
     
    PapaGoose03 likes this.
  25. PapaGoose03

    PapaGoose03 Poo-Bah (2,319) May 30, 2005 Michigan
    Society

    If 'pharmaceutical grade' beer means that I can forgo a flu shot by drinking a beer, well I'm all for that. :wink:
     
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