Jalapeno tincture questions

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by jricharc, May 22, 2018.

  1. jricharc

    jricharc Aspirant (246) Feb 16, 2012 Virginia

    So I am looking to make a jalapeno tincture to add a little heat to a Dead Rise copycat recipe I brewed a few weeks ago. I picked up some everclear to soak them in but I wanted to see what tips folks might have. Do you slice them up, roast them first, keep the seeds, how long to soak? I want to make additional tinctures outside of jalapenos for future brews but this will be my first attempt at one so I wanted to get some thoughts.
     
  2. NeroFiddled

    NeroFiddled Poo-Bah (9,486) Jul 8, 2002 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    I just wash the peppers with alcohol, and go from there. For just heat I'd de-seed them and put the seeds and veins in a nylon bag and soak until I get what I need. For actual Jalapeno flavor you'd need the flesh as well. If you're going to do that just remove the stems and cut them in half and soak that in a nylon bag. I don't generally do that because the flesh gives it some grassy and vegetal flavor. How much you'll need I don't know, but if you taste it everyday you should be good. Start with a few, you can always add more. And as far as making a tincture goes I'm not sure but I'd imagine it works the same way, you'd just have to be careful not to add too much extra alcohol.
     
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  3. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (134) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina

    Never added peppers to brew, but I have eaten plenty of them.
    Heat can change from pepper to pepper even from the same plant. Using "X" number of peppers one time might not yield the same results another time. For chiles, past performance is not necessarily an indicator of future results.

    Perceived bitterness also changes from pepper to pepper, and from within each individual pepper.
    Nibble on the green flesh to get a feel for the heat, flavor and how bitter it is or is not. After the heat has subsided from the first bite, take another nibble of only the white pulpy membrane.
    Those subjective tests will help you gauge the differences and maybe give you an idea of how much you want to accentuate each characteristic.
    I've read but cannot confirm that the seeds are surrounded by, but contain little, capsaicin. (the day after a pepper bender might cause one to contest that premise)

    Latex gloves are you friend when slicing/chopping hot peppers.
     
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  4. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Initiate (174) Dec 30, 2003 Wisconsin

    I've done a vodka soak of jalapenos many times with great success. Chop them up, seeds and all, let them soak overnight, or longer if you can. I'd use vodka rather than Everclear to prevent adding too much alcohol, but if you want the extra kick, go for it. I use about 2 peppers per gallon for a medium heat.
     
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  5. MrOH

    MrOH Crusader (794) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    Keep in mind that you're going to be adding flavor as well as heat. Is the flavor of jalapeno something that you'd like to add (vegetal and herbaceous?). For just heat, you may want something that has more heat, like a habanero, which has a more fruity flavor, but due to the extreme of heat, you likely won't get much of it.

    So far as tinctures, I like to remove the seeds and ribs, but I'm always looking to add flavor as well as heat when I use chilis. I also like to use dried chilis, and I tend to use them for stouts and porters, so probably to different effect from what you're going for.
     
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  6. NeroFiddled

    NeroFiddled Poo-Bah (9,486) Jul 8, 2002 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    Yes, I generally use Anchos which are perfect for a stout or porter because they give it a smoother heat, no vegetal character, and a nice fruity pepper character. My procedure for them is simply to rinse them in water, dry them, tear the stem off and toast them lightly in a non-stick skillet without any oil until they become lightly fragrant, and then tear them open and toss them into a nylon bag and they're ready to go. I've never used Anchos (which are dried Pasillas BTW) in a light beer but I think they'd certainly work. Has anyone done this? I'd imagine they might be great in a Vienna lager or something similar with some bready, toasty, and caramelish malt.
     
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  7. VikeMan

    VikeMan Meyvn (1,407) Jul 12, 2009 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    Anchos sounds interesting. What's your typical dose for anchos? Do you think they could work in a blonde ale?
     
  8. jricharc

    jricharc Aspirant (246) Feb 16, 2012 Virginia

    I am thinking that I want a little of the vegetal flavor along with a touch of heat but nothing that overwhelms the overall profile. I am trying to make something that will be great for summer cookouts pairing with burgers and other gilled fare. Maybe ill try about 5 medium sized sliced jalapenos in just enough everclear to cover them in a mason jar and let them sit until I keg in about 2.5 weeks. In my head I am thinking of something like an Old Bay seasoning that had cayenne peppers added would be the thought you get with it but I am willing to experiment around.
     
  9. NeroFiddled

    NeroFiddled Poo-Bah (9,486) Jul 8, 2002 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    Yeah, that's the question. I'm not sure they'd work in a blonde ale, but hell, it couldn't be nearly as bad as Ed's Cave Creek Chili Beer could it? I think the flavor of the dried and then toasted pepper is nice, but you'd probably want some of the heat as well otherwise it might be weird, as in having pepper flavor but no heat. It could work but it would be a balancing act that might be a lot of work to find.

    As for dosing rate I don't think that's linear at all. In a Belgian-style stout (1.085 O.G., 1.019 F.G, 8.66% ABV, 26 IBU) of 6 bbls I used 16 oz. for 10 minutes in the boil (25 minute knock out), and then another pound "dry hopped" following primary. The heat is clearly there, and although you don't really get the pepper flavor I think it's working in a supporting role. If I brew it again I'll add a more to the "dry hop" but de-seed those because I don't want to add any more heat. And on that note, I do have another beer planned that's similar but it would be more of a Mexican-cake Stout with cinnamon and vanilla, cocoa nibs, and toasted coconut. I'd probably use the exact same amounts. Given the cost of vanilla beans these days that may never happen though.
     
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  10. jricharc

    jricharc Aspirant (246) Feb 16, 2012 Virginia


    More details on this, it sounds awesome!
     
  11. MrOH

    MrOH Crusader (794) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    FTFY
     
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  12. NeroFiddled

    NeroFiddled Poo-Bah (9,486) Jul 8, 2002 Pennsylvania
    Beer Trader

    Mexican cake beers are not my idea, there are quite a few out there. My twist was the toasted coconut, which is also expensive. I was going to age it in Bourbon barrels and call it "Midnight Rodeo".
     
  13. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (134) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina

    ...since you're willing to experiment, Zatarains makes a liquid crab & shrimp boil concentrate. We use it in our shrimp and/or crawfish boils to augment the bags of dry matter. It's pretty potent stuff....one reviewer on Chowhound said "You could use it for crowd control in a riot". Probably not far off the mark depending on the delivery method.

    One can usually get it at major chain grocery stores either in the spice area or seafood counter, typically less than $2 for a 4-ounce bottle.
    Pick some up and give it a whiff. If you think it's worth a shot consider measuring at first with an eye dropper instead of divisions of a teaspoon. It's loud enough that a little too much could easily drown out or muddle most everything else, like trying to unsalt a casserole.

    The ingredients are WATER, POLYSORBATE 80, EXTRACTIVES OF: RED PEPPER, BAY, CLOVE, BLACK PEPPER, THYME, MARJORAM AND ARTIFICIAL SPICE FLAVORS.
    Something that might make me hesitate would be the unknown of "artificial spice flavors".
     
  14. jricharc

    jricharc Aspirant (246) Feb 16, 2012 Virginia

    Funny you mention that, I happened to have some on hand when I brewed this and I added a little to the boil. I didn't go crazy because I wanted to try it first but I did add approximately 1-2 oz to the boil.
     
  15. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (134) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina

    I'd be interested to know your impressions on the presence of crab boil aroma, flavor and heat in the glass (too much, not enough, just right), over and above any other additions you might have made.
     
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  16. jricharc

    jricharc Aspirant (246) Feb 16, 2012 Virginia

    I will update this thread with photos and initial thoughts once I keg it in a few weeks. I kept notes on my ingredients and process so if it turns out worthwhile I will share them for sure! Thanks for the feedback and suggestions!
     
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  17. jricharc

    jricharc Aspirant (246) Feb 16, 2012 Virginia

  18. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Initiate (174) Dec 30, 2003 Wisconsin

    That looks very familiar to me. I slice mine a little thinner, but, good enough.
     
  19. jricharc

    jricharc Aspirant (246) Feb 16, 2012 Virginia

    So, I kegged my Dead Rise copycat. It’s pretty damn close to the real thing, I might dial back the old bay seasoning by a tablespoon but that may have been the zataran’s crab boil I added as well.

    The jalapeño tincture added just enough bite to keep your tounge warm throughout the entire glass. Overall I am very pleased and think this will be great with burgers and dogs over the next few weeks!
    [​IMG]
     
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  20. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (134) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina

    Wish I could taste that one. Sounds like it would pair well with just about anything that's normally thrown into a low country boil (small volume example HERE).

    Does Old Bay have much heat to it? I'm not as familiar with it as I am with Zatarain's, which I know does have a fair amount of heat. Mentioning that because if you scale back the Zatarain's you might notice a loss of heat.
     
  21. jricharc

    jricharc Aspirant (246) Feb 16, 2012 Virginia

    Old bay is a unique seasoning, it has a very distinct smell and taste but it does not have much heat at all, that was my reasoning for adding the jalapeno.

     
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  22. MrOH

    MrOH Crusader (794) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    Old bay is pretty unique. It's spicy but not hot, if you dig it. They don't give as great a description on the back of the can as they used to, but if memory serves, ingredients are: celery seed, red & black pepper, mustard seed, paprika, bay leaf, and mace (along with salt of course).

    I like the Dead Rise as an accompaniment to seafood dishes in the summer that don't have a lot of Old Bay on them, but for picking crabs or a shrimp boil, it's a bit too much of a good thing.