Jalapeno white ipa

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by Hateme99, Sep 30, 2018.

?

What type of pepper ( easy to find please I live in South east)

This poll will close on Oct 21, 2018 at 2:25 PM.
  1. Jalapeno

    2 vote(s)
    28.6%
  2. Habonaro

    2 vote(s)
    28.6%
  3. Reaper

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Scotch bonnet

    3 vote(s)
    42.9%
  5. Scorpin

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Hateme99

    Hateme99 Initiate (26) Sep 30, 2018 North Carolina

    Ok so this is my first ever post on any thread, on any website asking for ideas or anything, so i made a white ipa (exstact kit) I added pineapple and Clementine to it and bitter orange peel and the peels from the Clementine, but I love the song bird jallapeno ale and was wondering what you all thought of adding jalapenos to what i have or another pepper any input would be much appreciated
     
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  2. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Initiate (195) Dec 30, 2003 Wisconsin

  3. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,227) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado

    Fresh jalapeño in a tincture may work. You can dose as needed thwn.
     
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  4. Mothergoose03

    Mothergoose03 Poo-Bah (2,276) May 30, 2005 Michigan
    Premium

    Have you packaged your beer?

    As for which pepper to use, I have no opinion because I'm not a lover of pepper in beer. Whichever is easiest for you to purchase.
     
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  5. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,737) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Premium

    The beer you are going for is not in my wheelhouse, so I have no advice other than taste it to evaluate where it is currently and whether it needs to change. If I made a pineapple-orange white IPA that I liked, I probably wouldn't change a thing. If I didn't like it, I would probably toss it. If it was in the middle ground, showing promise, but not where it needs to be, I might ask "what else does it need?" I cannot imagine answering that question with peppers. Like I said, not my wheelhouse. But if you taste it, it may speak to you about peppers.

    BTW, I wonder if this is the beer you referenced.
     
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  6. chavinparty

    chavinparty Initiate (117) Jan 4, 2015 New Hampshire

    Scotch bonnets or habaneros are my favorite peppers flavor wise I’ve had good luck seeding and chopping 1 or 2 into the fermenter a few days before kegging. It’s always a gamble though. You could ruin a whole batch pretty easy. Whatever you do don’t use reapers
     
  7. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Disciple (378) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    Also a fan off Habs and jalapeños, but,,,,, the above advice should be noted. I have killed several 5 gallon batches with either pepper by using toooo much.
     
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  8. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Initiate (195) Dec 30, 2003 Wisconsin

    I've never used too much, with jalapenos anyway. If using habanero or ghost or something crazy, I would remove all the seeds and only use 1/4 or 1/2 in 5-6 gallons.
     
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  9. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (73) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Trader

    It's easy to get too much heat in anything...drinks, stews, desserts, eyes (OUCH ! !). Mitigating excessive contributions is a challenge.

    Seems to me it's a crap-shoot adding fresh peppers (whole or chopped and seeded, or otherwise) to a beer if only for the reason that pepper heat intensity can vary from plant to plant and even between peppers form the same bush. If I wanted to add pepper heat to beer I'd probably take the tincture route at bottling......that's not to say others haven't hit their mark with fresh, but more to say that the chances of it being consistently repeatable is more likely with a tincture.

    Something I don't know for sure is whether pepper heat/flavor tends to lessen over time after bottling. My instincts tell me it does not auto-subdue.
     
    #9 riptorn, Oct 1, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2018
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  10. dmtaylor

    dmtaylor Initiate (195) Dec 30, 2003 Wisconsin

    No, it doesn't mellow out.
     
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  11. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Disciple (378) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    My best effort was 2 whole Habs tossed in the last 10 l
    Minutes of the boil, then fished out and discarded. The smoky hab taste was there, just a little, but it was super. Beer was a imperial black with blueberries.
     
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  12. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (73) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Trader

    5-gallon batch?
    Were the habaneros smoked, or was it that you perceived a "smokey" flavor from regular, fresh habaneros?
     
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  13. 4truth

    4truth Aspirant (238) Jan 30, 2015 Illinois
    Trader

    I am no brewer - home, professional or otherwise - but I know what I like and this sounds amazing.
     
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  14. donspublic

    donspublic Poo-Bah (1,567) Aug 4, 2014 Texas
    Premium Trader

    Depends on what you are looking for, if you want the peppers fruit to come thru, jalapeno is best bet, don't want the heat, devein and deseed it. If you want the heat no fruit, go with a habanero/scotch bonnet that has thinner skin. If you want a mix of heat/vegetal flavor you can control the heat by cutting the pepper(s) in half and removing the veins and seeds from one side.
    Also if you are going to do dark beers and would like some smoke brought into the equation, look at chipotle and ancho dried peppers. chipotle bringing lots of heat and smoke to the party and ancho bringing a mild heat and earthiness with a touch of smoke.
     
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  15. MrOH

    MrOH Champion (809) Jul 5, 2010 Maryland

    I'd go with the tincture method, for the reasons @riptorn mentioned above. I'd use Scotch Bonnets and a high-proof rum for it, as it would fit well with the rest of the recipe.

    Scotch bonnets tend to be used in my favorite hot sauces (caribbean style), they have a great fruitiness to them, even more-so than habaneros, which is why I voted for them. Jalapenos have more of a vegetal/herbal flavor, which wouldn't necessarily jive with what you're going for.

    That being said, how experienced with homebrewing are you? There's a lot going on here, and it will be tough to balance it out. Be prepared for it to be a bit muddled, and maybe a bit tough to swallow (figuratively and literally)
     
  16. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Disciple (378) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    The Habs I grow give heat and a smokey taste which I find very attractive. They were fresh picked.

    I should also say I poked a hole in both of them before tossing in.

    Other brews which were crap were Habs or jalaps cut in half and either boiled for 10 or into the secondary. For me, burning hot, overwhelming just killed any fun for drinking.

    Go with low amounts to start, you can aways up the peppers for the next batch.
     
  17. campbellvt

    campbellvt Initiate (26) Sep 29, 2018 Tennessee

    I'd have to agree here....and while I would not want to deter any brewer of chasing something they really want in their beer, you may find the fruity, sweet, bitter additions you've already pulled off with the IPA will contrast abhorrently with pepper/heat. I would recommend, up to you of course, splitting a pale ale over a few smaller fermenters and dosing in different ways to see what works best before going the full monty on the pepper addition. But hey, if not, I'd love to hear how it turns out!
     
  18. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (126) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    I have to agree not to go with jalapeños for what you're after. Maybe if you can find some ripe, red ones. I don't think the green pepper flavor is what you want. Any red pepper will have a fruiter, berry-like flavor than green. (They are technically berries, after all.) From your list, I would probably go with Scotch Bonnet because of the relatively milder heat. Superhot peppers like Carolina Reaper and Scorpion peppers have an amazing aroma and flavor if you can handle the heat. I think they're something like 3-7 hotter than a habanero or Scotch Bonnet. If you use one, I'd remove the seeds and membrane. WEAR GLOVES! I use half of one in a big batch of soup and it makes something that most people would consider way too spicy to eat, so you may not even want to use a whole pepper.

    Caveat emptor.
     
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  19. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (73) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Trader

    The heat of most hot peppers is okay by me when not trying to go off the deep end with them, but I really like the flavor of habanero. So much so that a couple years ago I grew some Zavory peppers, which have a heat level of low to nil (about 100 Scoville units) and have the flavor of habanero! (they really do, too)
    That might work for some folks when they nail their heat level and want some additional pepper flavor.
     
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  20. Hateme99

    Hateme99 Initiate (26) Sep 30, 2018 North Carolina

    It is
     
  21. donspublic

    donspublic Poo-Bah (1,567) Aug 4, 2014 Texas
    Premium Trader

    hmm, you know they used picked jalapenos in that beer. That is a pretty different taste profile than you will get from anything listed above. Pickling does take some of the raw vegetative flavor out of the vegetable, but will also add a little tartness.
     
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  22. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Disciple (378) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    Where did u buy those peppers/seeds????
     
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  23. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (73) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Trader

    Mine were seedlings from a local nursery., but not at $6 a pop like I linked earlier. I think they were developed by Burpee, who has seed.
    Southern Exposure Seed Exchange has them a little cheaper.
     
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  24. chavinparty

    chavinparty Initiate (117) Jan 4, 2015 New Hampshire

    Might have to try this out.too bad I just brewed my imperial stout Sunday. Interesting how the terroir affects habanero flavor. In southwestern nh mine are decidedly tropical and fruity. I make about 50 bottles of habanero hot sauce every year and people can’t get enough of it. Might have to start selling it
     
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  25. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Disciple (378) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    Sorry, missed the link.
     
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  26. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (73) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Trader

    No worries.....you can make it up by letting me be one of the hellians that slides into your barn if I ever make it back to VT as a leaf-peeper. :stuck_out_tongue:
    BTW, I would never pay for Zavory seedlings again. Seed is about 1/30th the cost.
     
  27. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (73) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Trader

    Fresh-picked, or pickled???
     
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  28. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Disciple (378) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    Swing in, burped sells 30 seeds for $7. I'll be growing them next year.
     
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  29. riptorn

    riptorn Initiate (73) Apr 26, 2018 North Carolina
    Trader

    Burpee = $10 incl/shipping, 30 seeds. Southern Exposure = $6 incl/shipping, 0.2g pack should have 24 – 40 seeds. Send your business to a down-south co-op.
     
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  30. donspublic

    donspublic Poo-Bah (1,567) Aug 4, 2014 Texas
    Premium Trader

    Dude, replying and reading at 2:50 am, need to stop that, wasn't even drinking :slight_frown: ignore that post, was thinking WTF would pickled jalapenos taste like in a beer
     
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  31. Hateme99

    Hateme99 Initiate (26) Sep 30, 2018 North Carolina

    I'm going with roasted pablano for three too five days then bottle that then add the habanero so I'll have a nice half and half thank you all for the votes and,thoughts
     
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