Session IPA Hop Suggestions

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse, Mar 13, 2018.

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Which hop would you use in a single-hop session IPA?

  1. Centennial

    56.7%
  2. Chinook

    20.0%
  3. Columbus

    23.3%
  4. Legacy

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    I've got a NEish style session IPA on tap right now with 100% Azacca hops. Tropical fruit, pineapple, and citrus galore. Awesome beer, but I'm getting a bit tired of all the fruity beers and want something more West Coast with sort of the opposite hop profile for a change of pace. I'm planning to stick with the single hop session IPA category. I'm looking at a base of Golden Promise and plan on adding 1# each of flaked rye and pale chocolate malt. Mashing @ 160° and fermenting with WY1450.

    Which of these hops would you use in this situation? (All are from HopsDirect's 2017 crop.)
     
  2. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Disciple (361) May 2, 2006 Utah

    I go with Centennial if there we no chocolate malt. With that dark malt, I'd go with Chinook. Personially, I dump the chocolate malt and go with a combination of all three C hops.. Cheers!
     
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  3. billandsuz

    billandsuz Disciple (356) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    Cascade. You want West Coast? Cascade.
    Ditch the chocolate malt. I don't know what percentage your 1# addition will be, but it's too much imo.
    My session west coast IPA would use Cascade, Cascade and then Cascade. At the moment.

    But, Centennial works awesome too. There are many good reasons why these 2 hops still dominate. They're real good.

    Now, if you do not want a fruit profile you probably should avoid all the hops listed.
    Cheers.
     
    mugs1789 and GormBrewhouse like this.
  4. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    I probably should have specified, but I'm going for a bit of a "session India Brown Ale." Basically a hoppy, bitter, low ABV American brown ale. Call it what you will, but that's the reason for the pale chocolate malt.

    As for the Centennial suggestions, I do think that that is the "safe" play here, and Legacy is a bit of an unknown.

    Not that it matters, because the listed hops are the only ones in my freezer (save for Citra, Azacca, and El Dorado), but what would you consider a good, non-fruity IPA hop? I'd prefer to keep it American; I apologize for the extra constraints.

    I'd agree that a blend is probably the best option here, but there are plenty of IPAs out there with some combination of these hops. I'm trying to use these low-ABV, single hop beers as a way to educate my palate a bit.
     
    utahbeerdude likes this.
  5. billandsuz

    billandsuz Disciple (356) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    You might be going more towards an English IPA. Use a neutral yeast and avoid crystal malts and you get something similar to West Coast and close to what you want I believe.

    In this instance English varieties would work very well. EKG and Fuggles being the obvious choices.

    I can't think of a good way to get out of a citrusy profile and still keep it west coast, except for the use of Mt. Hood, Nugget and maybe a few others. Most "C" hops are adding some to a lot of citrus flavor and aroma and those are more West Coast than anything going.

    Load up on the Nugget at the end. A moderate bittering addition will work wonders with a lower gravity brew too.

    Whatever you end up with it will be fine and unique.
    Cheers.
     
  6. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    I don't know from experience, since I've never used it myself, but from what I can tell, 1450 is relatively neutral, and I definitely avoid crystal malts in all cases. I don't prefer the flavor profile; that's why I've added roasted malt here.

    Also, I don't really mind a hint of citrus for this beer. I get that its a component of most American hops. I just don't want to fruit character to lead or be too sweet. Bitter grapefruit rind is better than candied orange.
     
  7. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Disciple (356) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    never had a india west coast brown ale, but, if that's the want then lose the rye and chocolate, add maybe a quarter lb of roasted barley, then add fuggles and goldings . ferment with notty or 05.

    no fruit
     
    billandsuz likes this.
  8. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    Trying to work with the ingredients I have. As far as grains and hops, I've pretty much listed everything I have here. Trying out the 1450 to see what it does for mouthfeel, since I'm shooting for ~4% or lower.
     
    GormBrewhouse likes this.
  9. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Disciple (356) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    oppps, missed the poll, so I vote centential, perhaps a .25 lb of chocolate, still not wanting the rye, but a 4 abv or lower if using it Id go light.
     
  10. Supergenious

    Supergenious Disciple (332) May 9, 2011 Michigan

    I’ve used 1450 in a session IPA. it turned out great. Fairy neutral flavor but leaves plenty of mouth feel. Just the thing for a session IPA. Cheers!
     
  11. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,715) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Premium

    I do not know Legacy. Centennial is my fav of the bunch. I sometimes pair with Columbus. Usually not a fan of chinook, except maybe low doses? But there is a recipe in Jen Talley's Session Beer book for an all Columbus pale ale/session IPA.
     
  12. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    That's good to hear!
     
  13. hoptualBrew

    hoptualBrew Initiate (0) May 29, 2011 Florida

    I’ve never been a fan of chocolate + hops. To each their own though. Would rather forfeit the $2 I spent on chocolate malt than make a keg of a weird beer.

    If you can pull it off props to you. I voted centennial before I saw chocolate. Change my vote to Columbus.
     
    MrOH likes this.
  14. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Disciple (361) May 2, 2006 Utah

    That beer is Squatter's Full Suspension Pale Ale. I've been drinking it for years, and it's most definitely my favorite Utah-brewed 4.0% beer (on tap, anyway). I was a bit surprised to learn (a while back) that it's all Columbus. Before that I would have guessed there was some Cascade in there. It has medaled at the GABF in one of the bitter categories in the past. Anyway, it's a great session beer. Cheers!
     
  15. GreenKrusty101

    GreenKrusty101 Defender (699) Dec 4, 2008 Nevada

    Should have just asked, what is your favorite hop?
     
    GormBrewhouse likes this.
  16. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    I brewed a hoppy porter a while back with Waimea, Amarillo, and Azacca. That grain bill was more complex, but did include 2# of pale chocolate malt and a half pound of chocolate wheat along with some brown malt and c40. I liked it. You guys are scaring me a bit, but based on that experience I don't think I'm out of line.

    I'm just really not a fan of caramel malt in general, and prefer roasty flavors. Maybe I should have gone with a darker malt in lower quantity?
     
  17. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    It's hard to say, since most of the time hops are used in combination with other varieties. Off the top of my head, though, I'd probably say Comet. Chinook and Columbus are both up there as well, but I've never had single hops beers featuring them. Also a big fan of Nelson, Galaxy, Citra, Apollo, etc.

    In general, I guess, I'm tend to like the more pungent, divisive hops, along with the ones that have a "wild" edge.
     
    GreenKrusty101 likes this.
  18. GreenKrusty101

    GreenKrusty101 Defender (699) Dec 4, 2008 Nevada

    Yes, and unfortunately for my wallet that usually means a proprietary hop. Lately for IPAs, I've been trying to use my homegrown Cascades, CTZ, Chinook, Centennial in the boil and then augment with proprietary ones in the keg (Citra, El Dorado, NS, Galaxy, Amarillo)
     
  19. utahbeerdude

    utahbeerdude Disciple (361) May 2, 2006 Utah

    I don't think there is any reason to be scared of hops and darker malts. I regularly make an American Brown that is quite hoppy. It has a combination of dark malts that I think go well with hops that are a bit less fruity. For that beer I have settled on a combination of (homegrown) Cascade and Willamette for flavor and aroma.

    My latest version in currently in the fermenter. For the first time I'm going to give it a dry hop this time with an ounce each of the Cascade and Willamette.

    Cheers!
     
    MrOH likes this.
  20. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    Brewing this now. I went with Chinook, and I kept all the pale chocolate and all of the rye.

    I let you know if it works out or if I regret ignoring some of your advice. :wink:
     
    frozyn and utahbeerdude like this.
  21. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    Well, I've head the beer on tap for a couple of weeks now, but haven't had much time to drink it as I've been busy.

    I'm not terribly pleased with the way it turned out. I'm perceiving what I think to be yeast bite, and the beer looks like mud. I know 1450 is known to take a while to settle out, but the keg has been undisturbed for ~3 weeks at serving temperature. I've pulled off maybe the first 4-5 pints, but it's still not clear. This seems ridiculous to me. Should I just leave it to cold condition for even longer, or should I try to fine with gelatin? I've never had yeast fail to drop out like this, and I've used non-flocculent strains in the past. Is it normal for this strain?
     
  22. billandsuz

    billandsuz Disciple (356) Sep 1, 2004 New York

    Gelatin will absolutely and magically clear your beer.

    There is some concern that it will clear the beer too well but that is a hard comparison to make. For example, you can pull out some character along with all that haze. Hop character for example. But again, hard to compare.

    Keep it real cold and add 1/2 half packet of dissolved gelatin*. It is magic. If you can cold crash to 32, I recommend you try. Leave it alone at 32 for 1 or 2 weeks with some gelatin finings then come back to it. You might be surprised.
    Truthfully, even a big and fresh IPA benefits from some lagering. All beer improves with a little quiet cold time.

    Cheers.

    *Boil a half cup of water. It will sterilize but more importantly it will remove dissolved oxygen. A few ounces added to a half packet of flavorless Knox. Let it sit. Stir. Add that gluey mess to your keg. Purge. Purge again. Purge it a few more times. Then roll or shake the keg to distribute the gelatin. Then cold crash. Real cold. Then let it sit quiet for 1 or 2 weeks. Voila. Magic.
     
  23. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,188) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado

    For what it's worth I made a similar beer, used almost exactly the same grist with Chinook and centennial and I hated the beer.
     
  24. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    Great, now you tell me! :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes: I'm hoping cleaning up the yeast in suspension will fix everything for me. The taste otherwise seems good, even if a bit heavy on the pale chocolate. I'd definitely tone it down next time.

    I added gelatin to the keg last night. I'll check on it maybe tomorrow night and see what kind of sludge comes out. Fingers crossed.
     
    SFACRKnight likes this.
  25. SFACRKnight

    SFACRKnight Meyvn (1,188) Jan 20, 2012 Colorado

    I had the idea of a wookus type beer in mind, I missed the mark so bad. Hope yours hits on all cylinders!
     
  26. Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse

    Ten_SeventySix_Brewhouse Initiate (123) Jul 20, 2016 Arizona

    After 4 weeks cold in the keg, and a week of that being with gelatin, the beer is still cloudy. I've poured off probably half to a full gallon, and I'm still seeing particulate matter in the beer. In addition to the yeast in suspension, I'm seeing what I think to be strings of gelatin in suspension. The spiciness I think to be yeast bite is also still present.

    I know this yeast supposedly takes a while to clear, but over a month in the fridge with gelatin seems absolutely ridiculous. Any ideas here? I'm going to let it sit as long as I can, but this may end up being a cooking beer/my first dumped batch.
     
  27. Prep8611

    Prep8611 Aspirant (228) Aug 22, 2014 New Jersey

    nothing wrong with dumping batch. It’s a bigger crime to drink beer that sucks just to get drunk.
     
    GormBrewhouse likes this.
  28. invertalon

    invertalon Devotee (400) Jan 27, 2009 Ohio

    I'd go with Columbus, personally. I like that hop a lot though... Don't care for Centennial too much unless blended with other hops... Just far too floral for me.
     
    Prep8611 likes this.
  29. Prep8611

    Prep8611 Aspirant (228) Aug 22, 2014 New Jersey

    Bells Two Hearted is the only beer I like that features centennial so heavily. They pretty much set the standard for centennial to my palate with hat beer. I’ve attempted to make a beer featuring centennial before and I agree it was too floral. Definitely needs some cascade or Citra with it.