Too Much Foam After First Pour

Discussion in 'Home Bar' started by DPC19, Mar 21, 2020.

  1. DPC19

    DPC19 Initiate (5) Dec 31, 2019

    I'm getting a perfect first pour and a lot of foam afterwards. I've been searching for a couple of days and haven't found anyone with this issue since the excess foam is usually in the first pour.
    Running 2 kegs, a IIPA and a bourbon aged stout at 38F, 12 PSI using 12ft of 3/16 line and picnic taps. Lowered the pressure to 10 PSI and didn't get any better.
    Please share your thoughts.
     
  2. billandsuz

    billandsuz Devotee (427) Sep 1, 2004 New York
    Industry

    Your post should be directed to the home bar forum. We have answered this problem a few dozen if not 100 times.

    You are using a picnic tap and the temperature/resistance is out of balance.

    Be sure ALL of the beer is 38, not just what the digital display is telling you. This is critical.
    Be sure you are actually at 38. Check it with a calibrated thermometer correctly. This is critical.
    Use only 3/16" beverage line. Not generic tubing.
    12' is a bit too long. Try 7' and work from there.
    Picnic taps aka cobra faucets are for picnics (or cobra's I guess). And you are not having a picnic. They do not work as a long term solution for draft beer (ever been to a bar with picnic taps?) Get a kegerator or build one, or build a keezer.

    Your resistance is quite high, assuming 2.2 to 3.0 per foot.
    Your temps are perhaps not exact.
    12 psi at 38 psi is 2.57 which might be a bit too high, but its in the range. And I can not stress enough, 38? or 39? 42? Very important.

    Cheers.
     
    #2 billandsuz, Mar 22, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
    DPC19 and DougC123 like this.
  3. DPC19

    DPC19 Initiate (5) Dec 31, 2019

    Thank you for the advice. I will ceck the actual beer temperature and shorten the beer line. I noticed the lines get full of CO2 bubbles after the first pour. I read on other threads that incresing pressure eliminates the bubbles in the line, but I'm already on the high side. I'm coiling the beer line to about 8" diameter. Can this be a problem.
     
  4. IceAce

    IceAce Savant (920) Jan 8, 2004 California
    Industry

    [QUOTE="DPC19, post: 6842483, member: 1285158"]Thank you for the advice. I will ceck the actual beer temperature and shorten the beer line.[/QUOTE]

    Both excellent points by Bill. The best way to get an accurate beer temp is to put a small glass of water in the keg box as it will tell you the liquid temp of beer in the lower part art of the keg box.

    When shortening the beer line, I suggest one foot increments, but I believe temp is the issue.


    [QUOTE="DPC19, post: 6842483, member: 1285158"]I noticed the lines get full of CO2 bubbles after the first pour. I read on other threads that incresing pressure eliminates the bubbles in the line, but I'm already on the high side.[/QUOTE]

    The threads you read are true. Those bubbles are the result of a slightly unbalanced system when the pressure is too low. This may mean that the beer temp at which you believe to be pouring may actually be slightly warmer than you think.

    Most people think that temp and pressure are an inverse relationship, but in reality, as beer temperature rises, so should pressure.



    Edit: Not sure why the quote function is giving me a hard time tonight, but you should get the idea
     
    #4 IceAce, Mar 22, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2020
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  5. DPC19

    DPC19 Initiate (5) Dec 31, 2019

    Bill and IceAce, thanks a lot for your help. The actual beer temperature was 41F, lowered the fridge temperature and now the beer is at 39F, which is OK. The foam issue got better, but I'm still getting tiny bubbles in the line after the first pour even with the pressure at 14 psi. Acording to the carbonation chart, the carb level is 2.70 for 39F and 14 psi, which is on the high side specially for the bourbon aged porter. Should I start trimming the beer line in 6" increments to avoid having to increase pressure?
     
  6. DougC123

    DougC123 Disciple (332) Aug 21, 2012 Connecticut

    Trimming the line will not help you correct out of balance. The longer line slows the flow of properly balanced beer, no amount of trimming can help keep the CO2 in solution. 14 is not "on the high side", it is the proper target. It may feel counter intuitive which makes you say it's high, but it's not. How long ago did you adjust the temp? This is like stopping a train, it will take a while for changes to fully take effect. You are asking a 5 gallon keg to warm up by 2 degrees while in a cold environment. I'd wait another day if you are less than 24 hours out, and then if you still have bubbles add a psi and wait another day. Feel free to drink during this test.
     
    Redrover and DPC19 like this.
  7. DPC19

    DPC19 Initiate (5) Dec 31, 2019

    Perfect pour now at 14.5 psi and 39F. Thank you guys for helping me out.
     
    DougC123 likes this.
  8. DougC123

    DougC123 Disciple (332) Aug 21, 2012 Connecticut

    Winner winner.
     
  9. IceAce

    IceAce Savant (920) Jan 8, 2004 California
    Industry

    Great news and congrats.

    Also, a big thanks from us for following up once the solution. More times than not, folks fix their rig and we never see them again.

    So grab a beer and enjoy...clean it regularly and don’t touch anything as long as it’s pouring properly.