Windsor

Discussion in 'Homebrewing' started by skleice, Sep 3, 2018.

  1. skleice

    skleice Aspirant (244) Aug 6, 2015 Connecticut

    Anybody with some good Windsor experience? Everything I read just says ''esters", but with no specifics. What kind of notes are you getting from Windsor? What temps are best?

    I'm planning on using this in my next gluten free NEIPA. GF beers tend to overattenuate, so Windsor may work well. I'll also be blending in just a touch of WB-06 & T-58 so I'll get some more points from those too.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. GormBrewhouse

    GormBrewhouse Disciple (371) Jun 24, 2015 Vermont

    Windsor is a great yeast. I use it in my Burton light, chocolate stout and oatmeal stout. It don't ferment down as low as notty or T-58 but gives a nice tasty beer. B sure to have plenty of headspace. It is a strong fermenter
     
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  3. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,619) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    Windsor used to be my yeast of choice for fermenting English Bitter Ales - I would ferment on the upper temperature range (e.g., 70 degrees F) to encourage esters. The flavors were fruity (I do not have anything more specific than fruity). A few years ago I 'discovered' Wyeast 1469 and that is now my preferred yeast for English Bitter Ales.

    I still use Danstar Windsor once a year for my Robust Porter. I like this strain for this batch since is does not attenuate well and my resulting Robust Porter has a lot of body - it is 'chewy'.

    If you co-pitch with another yeast strain then the beer will likely attenuate well (i.e., have a low FG).

    Cheers!
     
  4. Granitebeard

    Granitebeard Initiate (94) Aug 24, 2016 Maine

    I went on a streak of using Windsor. I tend to be on the colder side of things but I would say I got some plum like flavors the most. A buddy said he got pear, and my father picked out a hint of peach... Not sure who was right as we were all drinking the same beer... I like it for plum like flavors in darker beers.
     
  5. Prep8611

    Prep8611 Aspirant (235) Aug 22, 2014 New Jersey

    I used it one time and wasn’t a fan. May have to try again as that was my second batch.
     
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  6. JohnConnorforealthistime

    JohnConnorforealthistime Initiate (51) Mar 10, 2016 Wisconsin

    Well, I just used it in an IPA that's hitting the dry hop keg tonight. I used it 80/20 with S-04. First time using it but I'll stop back and give my gravity sample impressions. I can tell you it is a fast beast of a yeast. I pitched on a Saturday around 2. Had airlock activity before I went to bed, woke up to crazy activity Sunday. By Monday morning, krausen was already pretty well gone. I didn't rehydrate.
     
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  7. scottakelly

    scottakelly Devotee (471) May 9, 2007 Ohio

    It's been many years for me. I recall always liking the flavor, but not liking that it took forever to flocculate.
     
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  8. JohnConnorforealthistime

    JohnConnorforealthistime Initiate (51) Mar 10, 2016 Wisconsin

    Kegged last night and took a sample. Very interesting yeast. A lot of bready, yeasty aromas off the bat. I know it's a low floccer and my strategy to use S-04 to aid in that didn't work. Probably have to split closer to 50/50. Flavor initially wasn't too far off. A lot of yeasty, bread notes but I figure that's a lot of yeast still in suspension (I don't full crash before kegging). I put my cylinder in the freezer for a bit to drop as much yeast as I could. I tried again and got a lovely fruit salad note. Reminded me of hawaiian punch almost. I think it will be a nice compliment for the citra/galaxy I'm dry hopping it with.

    On another note, they aren't lying about its attenuation. I got 69% which is a tick higher than the 65% they advertise. I again was hoping the S-04 would help in this department which leads me to think I need to get that split closer to 50/50 next time. First time using it, I think I'll continue to explore with it. I've read its in the same family as T-58... just a POF- version. Which could make it a great candidate for big biotransformation.
     
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  9. minderbender

    minderbender Initiate (179) Jan 18, 2009 New York

    I've never used any of these yeasts. The one thing I'll mention is that according to the manufacturer WB-06 is var. diastaticus (link to PDF), meaning it is not a good choice if you want to avoid over-attenuation.
     
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  10. pweis909

    pweis909 Poo-Bah (1,730) Aug 13, 2005 Wisconsin
    Premium

    Windsor is a little estery but not a ton, at least in the 64-68F range that typifies my usage. It doesn’t attenuate as well as many would like but I think it nice for low gravity British beers. I’m hard pressed to attribute a specific fruit to it.
     
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  11. skleice

    skleice Aspirant (244) Aug 6, 2015 Connecticut

    Thanks for the replies. I'm gonna give it a shot and see what happens. I don't care about it flocculating since it's a NEIPA. The attentuation will be interesting since GF beers tend to overattenuate, but WB-06 is a mad dog. The WB will only be 1-2% though. Stay tuned...
     
  12. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,619) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    @skleice, please do report back on how your beer turned out.

    You made mention of "The WB will only be 1-2% though" and even though it is a small percentage of the yeast you are pitching it seems to me that it will 'perform' bigger than that since there will be plenty of 'leftover food' (i.e., sugars that will not be consumed by Windsor/T-58).

    Best of luck with this batch!

    Cheers!
     
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