Firestone Walker's First-Ever Hazy IPA: Mind Haze

Discussion in 'Beer News & Releases' started by Todd, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. Todd

    Todd Founder (5,621) Aug 23, 1996 California
    Staff

    Paso Robles, CA: After nearly a year of experimentation, Firestone Walker Brewing Company is set to unveil Mind Haze—a hazy IPA that sets the pace with a luscious texture, explosive tropical hoppiness and an unsurpassed shelf freshness for the style.

    “We’re finally ready do a hazy IPA the Firestone way,” said Brewmaster Matt Brynildson.

    Indeed, as the hazy movement caught fire, Brynildson and his team remained patient. They tinkered with the style, retooling and refining their beer with several R&D batches until they nailed what they were after.

    The result is Mind Haze, Firestone Walker’s first-ever hazy IPA, and a fitting complement to the brewery’s robust IPA portfolio. Mind Haze launches in all Firestone Walker markets starting this week.

    Déjà Vu
    For Brynildson, the hazy IPA style doesn’t just hearken back to the East Coast, but all the way back to southeastern Germany and the Bavarian Hefeweizens of lore.

    “I recently spent some time at Gutmann brewery in Titting, and they have this amazing beer called Weizenbock,” Brynildson said. “It’s this beautiful 7.2% ABV hazy beer with a creamy mouthfeel and a tropical-banana aroma that fits right in with the hazy IPAs of today—and yet they’ve been making it for more than 50 years.”

    With that historical context in mind, Brynildson and his team embarked on the goal of creating a beer that would ring all of the bells of a new age hazy IPA while putting their own stamp on the style. Along the way, they wanted to create a beer that would stand shoulder to shoulder with Firestone Walker’s other IPAs in terms of quality and shelf stability.

    “We’re not relying on residual yeasts or starches for turbidity,” Brynildson said. “The haziness and mouthfeel of Mind Haze are cultivated by more stable means, namely using 40 percent wheat and oats in the grain bill while nailing the timing and interplay of our hop additions.”

    He added, “We are drawing from our past experience in making Hefeweizens, and then aiming to amplify the esters gained from a specially chosen yeast and an array of really fruity hops.”

    All in The Mind
    The name and imagery of Mind Haze are a nod to the marine mists that routinely envelop California’s Central Coast—and to the idea of a beer that messes with perceptions of what a hazy IPA can be.

    Said Brynildson, “We are not claiming to reinvent the style—we want Mind Haze to offer the best of what people expect from a hazy IPA. That said, we’re going about it in a little different way, and I think that’s what gives Mind Haze its own unique signature.”

    Firestone Walker Brewing Company is a pioneering regional craft brewery founded in 1996 and located on the coast of California. Firestone Walker’s main brewery in Paso Robles produces a diverse portfolio ranging from iconic pale ales to vintage barrel-aged beers. The Barrelworks facility in Buellton makes eccentric wild ales, while the Propagator pilot brewhouse in Venice specializes in R&D beers and limited local offerings. For more information: https://www.firestonebeer.com

    https://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/2210/374705/

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  2. Harrison8

    Harrison8 Poo-Bah (2,953) Dec 6, 2015 Missouri
    Premium Trader

    Very intriguing. I always considered their unfiltered work very hazy-esque. So this follows the path of pre-existing unfiltered IPAs in the portfolio and then folds in more of a hefeweizen for added haziness?

    I'm interested. Weizenbocks are delightfully delicious.
     
  3. mhull

    mhull Initiate (91) Apr 11, 2008 Massachusetts

    Interesting mix of hops I don't think I've seen in this style before.

    HOPS: Kettle: Cashmere, Mandarina. Dry Hop: El Dorado, Idaho 7, Azacca, Mosaic, Cashmere
     
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  4. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,760) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    "namely using 40 percent wheat and oats in the grain bill" Yup, that percentage does indeed seem to be inspired by German Wheat beer recipes.

    Cheers!
     
    Harrison8 likes this.
  5. thuey

    thuey Aspirant (223) Nov 13, 2015 California

    I thought most of their Leo vs Ursus beers (Fortem, Adversus, Gen-1) were hazies (unfiltered hops with a bubblegum-like yeast)? I wasn't really into them personally, but I will likely try this as a single if I can.
     
  6. AZBeerDude72

    AZBeerDude72 Meyvn (1,423) Jun 10, 2016 Arizona
    Premium Trader

    I wish I was excited but isn't this what everyone is already putting out? Seems like it will just get lost in the stadium of hazy beers that already exist.
     
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  7. raynmoon

    raynmoon Crusader (782) Aug 13, 2011 Colorado

    Not when it's available at grocery stores and gas stations for $10 per 6-pack :sunglasses:.
     
  8. AZBeerDude72

    AZBeerDude72 Meyvn (1,423) Jun 10, 2016 Arizona
    Premium Trader

    Agree, I love their pricing and beers in general, just wishing the hazy craze was not the sole focus of breweries for 2019 but I know I am not going to see that stop any time soon.
    :beers:
     
  9. Brewday

    Brewday Initiate (121) Dec 25, 2015 New York

    Yes, but when you have a master brewer taking a year to get it perfect It's probably going to be great.
     
  10. tzieser

    tzieser Meyvn (1,001) Nov 21, 2006 New Jersey
    Trader

    Why do they say "First-Ever Hazy IPA" when I just had a glass of Patrick Hayze about a month ago?

    [​IMG]
    [h/t untappd]
     
  11. eldoctorador

    eldoctorador Zealot (563) Dec 12, 2014 California

    first ever wide distribution Hazy IPA
     
  12. tzieser

    tzieser Meyvn (1,001) Nov 21, 2006 New Jersey
    Trader

    Yeah, I figured as much.

    You should be their PR rep, because they fail to mention that anywhere in the press release.
     
  13. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,760) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    Didn't Sam Adams and Sierra Nevada and New Belgium already do this?
    • Sam Adams New England IPA
    • Sierra Nevada Hazy Little Things
    • New Belgium Voodoo Ranger Juicy Haze IPA
    Cheers!

    @tzieser
     
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  14. pjeagles

    pjeagles Initiate (138) May 29, 2005 New Mexico
    Trader

    If you thought the five month old Union Jack sitting in everyone's local store didn't age well...
     
  15. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,760) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    The 'good news' is that if I see Mind Haze in the next month I at least know this batch will be fresh. It is only a matter of time though where I will only be seeing 5+ month old batches if this brand is consistent with the distribution of other FW brands in my area.

    Cheers!
     
    AZBeerDude72 likes this.
  16. Todd

    Todd Founder (5,621) Aug 23, 1996 California
    Staff

    It's a first for Firestone Walker. It's their first widely-distributed Hazy IPA.
     
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  17. beardown2489

    beardown2489 Disciple (343) Oct 5, 2012 Illinois

    It’s not what everyone else is doing. Everyone else is relying on yeast (London ale strains and Conan) that eventually ends up falling out of suspension. FW is trying to make this style beer in a smarter way that will keep in looking cleaner and lasting longer.
     
  18. beardown2489

    beardown2489 Disciple (343) Oct 5, 2012 Illinois

    In the description of that series, they mention that it was a playground to text different yeast strains.

    Looks like mind haze is implementing things they learned from that Patrick Hayze series.
     
    tzieser likes this.
  19. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,760) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    It is not the yeast (1318 or other English ale yeasts) in suspension that makes Juicy/Hazy beers have a murky/opaque appearance. They look this way due to a heavy load of protein-polyphenol complexes.

    Cheers!

    @erway
     
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  20. AZBeerDude72

    AZBeerDude72 Meyvn (1,423) Jun 10, 2016 Arizona
    Premium Trader

    “We’re not relying on residual yeasts or starches for turbidity,” Brynildson said. “The haziness and mouthfeel of Mind Haze are cultivated by more stable means, namely using 40 percent wheat and oats in the grain bill while nailing the timing and interplay of our hop additions.”

    My local guy has been adding in the wheat for awhile now in their hazy beers to give it a solid mouthfeel etc. I am not sure they used Oats though so that would be new for me.
     
  21. beardown2489

    beardown2489 Disciple (343) Oct 5, 2012 Illinois

    Many of these hazy beers have 20 % oats. Sometimes more.
     
    AZBeerDude72 likes this.
  22. jeebeel

    jeebeel Initiate (159) Jun 17, 2003 Texas

    Great, the beer market really needs another hazy IPA.....
     
    AZBeerDude72 likes this.
  23. Giantspace

    Giantspace Defender (678) Dec 22, 2011 Pennsylvania

    I had a local oat pale ale a year or so ago and it was fantastic.

    I will try this if it’s a good price point.

    So far I’m dry this year and looking to stay there till February or later

    Enjoy
     
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  24. jakecattleco

    jakecattleco Poo-Bah (1,891) Sep 3, 2008 California
    Premium Trader

    Agreed, I'd much rather find 6ers of Pivo that are 3 months old vs. the typical 12 months+ (if I find it at all).

    Hell at this point, I'd be happy to grab 5 month old Pivo.
     
    AZBeerDude72 likes this.
  25. EnronCFO

    EnronCFO Devotee (498) Mar 29, 2007 Massachusetts

    Like Sierra Nevada, FW is a brewery that I inherently trust. It’s one of the few where bottling/canning dates can be extended several months and you can still be confident you’re getting good beer. I look forward to trying it.
     
  26. chipawayboy

    chipawayboy Disciple (398) Oct 26, 2007 Massachusetts

    Like Sierra Nevada, FW is a brewery whose beers gather dust at my local bottle shop. Their lastest diss of the east coast w/this hazy IPA is not likely to make me consider buying any of their beers...:grin:
     
  27. jakecattleco

    jakecattleco Poo-Bah (1,891) Sep 3, 2008 California
    Premium Trader

    Please explain how they've 'dissed' the East Coast with this recipe, which I assume you haven't tried?
     
  28. GetMeAnIPA

    GetMeAnIPA Zealot (544) Mar 28, 2009 California

    Pivo is one of my favorite beers. Where did it go? Ever since their lager came out I can’t find it.
     
  29. FatBoyGotSwagger

    FatBoyGotSwagger Meyvn (1,136) Apr 4, 2009 Pennsylvania

    Perhaps it was with calling it an East Coast style rather than a New England style IPA. Or it could be he gave credit to the Germans for brewing beer to the style(just not as hoppy) 50 or more years ago. Maybe he doesn't like the term Hazy.

    “We’re not relying on residual yeasts or starches for turbidity,” maybe this.

    or claiming to reinvent the style. This is all I can speculate could be offensive per say.
     
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  30. jakecattleco

    jakecattleco Poo-Bah (1,891) Sep 3, 2008 California
    Premium Trader

    Same on my end, bummed.
     
    GetMeAnIPA likes this.
  31. beardown2489

    beardown2489 Disciple (343) Oct 5, 2012 Illinois

    Please explain the diss.

    FW is attempting to make a beer that delivers flavors found in NEIPA. They want to make a beer that is stable, affordable and won’t fall of a cliff after 3 or 4 weeks. I don’t see anything insulting about that.

    I think the fact that they are committed to that means they are actually paying homage to the style and trying to make something that will be reliable for consumers rather than a beer that needs to be bought and consumed immediately. It’s not an insult. It’s a service to the US beer market.
     
  32. chipawayboy

    chipawayboy Disciple (398) Oct 26, 2007 Massachusetts

    Was somewhat drunk when I wrote that stupid post. Agree w your comment.
     
  33. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,760) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    One more 'vote' for what the heck happened with the distribution of packaged Pivo? I have not seen this beer in some time and in the past when I did see it the beer was invariably old. Did they make the decision that if they can't provide this product non-old they just won't distribute it at all?

    Cheers!

    @jakecattleco
     
  34. Claude-Irishman

    Claude-Irishman Disciple (336) Jun 4, 2015 New Jersey

    I hope it is in my distribution area-
     
  35. beardown2489

    beardown2489 Disciple (343) Oct 5, 2012 Illinois

    Pick is unavailable my distributor in Illinois as well. It had been coming in consistently fresh for the last year or so. That stopped in the last month or so
     
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  36. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,760) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    Well, this is a 'past tense' situation but you were lucky then. Needless to say but you are unlucky now.

    Cheers!
     
  37. beardown2489

    beardown2489 Disciple (343) Oct 5, 2012 Illinois

    Yea. Went to place an order yesterday and was told no go on Pivo

    Maybe they are taking a break to let the markets clear out and then re enter with fresh product. Who knows...
     
  38. kdb150

    kdb150 Devotee (424) Mar 8, 2012 Pennsylvania

    Pardon my ignorance here, but how are you not relying on residual starches for turbidity if you're cultivating haziness by using wheat and oats in the grain bill?
     
  39. JackHorzempa

    JackHorzempa Poo-Bah (3,760) Dec 15, 2005 Pennsylvania
    Premium

    Wheat and oats are higher in proteins on a per unit of weight basis than barley malt. Brewers of 'NEIPA' beers are utilizing these grains to 'up' the protein content of the wort/beer. These proteins will then aggregate with polyphenols:

    "Beer colloidal haze is generally the result of beer protein molecules joining together with polyphenols to form molecular aggregates of a size large enough to cause visual turbidity."

    Cheers!

    P.S. When I homebrew my 'NEIPA' beers I utilize a minimum of 2 lbs. of higher protein grains (e.g., wheat malt, flaked oats,...) for a 5 gallon batch of beer.
     
    stevepat likes this.