Tag: Malt

Kulmbacher: Strong, Dark, and Hoppy History by the Glass by

Before the proliferation of Pilsner, Germany had Kulmbacher—a strong, dark, and surprisingly hoppy lager.

Able Seedhouse + Brewery Becomes First Minnesota Brewery in Decades to Make Its Own Malt News by

With the release of a Rye Brown Ale called Seeded, Able became the first brewery in Minnesota to produce a beer with its own malt since the late 1960s.

Colorado Malting Company Launches State’s First Farmhouse Brewery News by

The Colorado Malting Company added a 5-barrel brewhouse to its 300-acre family farm, making The Colorado Farm Brewery the first venture of its kind in the state.

A Journey Through the Past: London Brews Porter Again Feature by

While it once represented up to three-quarters of the beer drunk in London, Porter’s popularity took a big hit after WWII. Today, enterprising brewers with a passion for the style and its history are rescuing this dark ale from obscurity.

Breweries Increasingly Commit to Sourcing Local Malts News by

As part of a broader effort to use regional ingredients in their recipes, breweries across the US are working with nearby maltsters to source more local grain.

Chuckanut Brewery and Kitchen: Championing Washington’s Terroir From the Source by

Chuckanut opened its second location, the South Nut, in the heart of the fertile Skagit Valley, within walking distance of some of the best grain—and grain research—in the country.

Congress at Home: Basic Malt Evaluation for Homebrewers BYOB by

Using simple tools on hand in most kitchens, homebrewers can assess the quality of new malts by following this at-home congress mash technique.

Scientists Sequence Complete Barley Genome News by

After more than 10 years of research, the complete barley genome has been sequenced by a consortium of researchers from 11 countries.

California’s First Micro-Malthouse to Open in Bay Area News by

With the opening of Admiral Maltings, California craft breweries will have access to sustainably farmed, locally grown barley malted practically next door.

Breaking Bread with Seto Õlu: Uncovering a Forgotten Kingdom’s Brewing Tradition Feature by

Hidden in Eastern Europe and forgotten for centuries, the fruity, slightly sweet, and full-bodied õlu, or beer, made by the Seto people is reminiscent of British Mild Ale, Kvass, a beverage made from fermented bread, and even root beer.

Baladin to Open Farm Brewery Emphasizing Beer’s Agricultural Roots News by

Teo Musso, one of the four original pioneers of Italy’s craft brewing movement, plans to debut Baladin Open Garden, a 786,000-square-foot beer park in the country’s Piedmont region, in June 2017.

A Mostly True Story: Homebrewing Wood Chipper Irish Red Ale BYOB by

A trip to Fargo, N.D., rekindles a love for malt-forward beers and inspires Wood Chipper Irish Red Ale, with an addition of roasted barley for a subtle color boost.

Winter is Coming: Homebrewing an Old Burton Ale BYOB by

For a boozy Winter Warmer that’s ready to drink in time for the coldest weather, brew this “Old Burtonish Ale” now.

Hold Me Closer, Tiny Lager: Boosting Flavor by Toasting Malt at Home BYOB by

Give a flavorful twist to a simple lager recipe from the “Barrel Master” at California’s Eagle Rock Brewery by toasting your own Pilsner malt.

Stjørdalsøl: Behind the Smoke, an Old Beer Style Thrives in Norway Feature by

Every winter in a quiet waterfront town in Norway, more than 500 members of the community brew a strong, smoked beer according to tradition. For centuries, this endangered style has remained virtually unknown to outsiders.

Field Studies: Brewers Look to Heritage Grains for Flavor Grain to Glass by

Instead of using mass produced barley, wheat and rye malt, brewers around the country are beginning to look to heritage grains to add character and complexity to their beers—varieties packed with flavor and history.

Beer News News by

White Labs to open East Coast location; Carlsberg stops production of Draught Burton Ale; individual beer sales now legal in Missouri; and New York seeks federally backed crop insurance.

Brewing in WWII History by the Glass by

War impacted British brewing both directly and indirectly. Government action is a good example of a direct influence.

Cultivating a Sense of Place in France Beer Without Borders by

In a nation that is known for, and takes great pride in, its tradition and terroir, a new wave of brewers is creating a culture of “bieroir” that embraces locally sourced ingredients.

Coffee, Beer Chaser: Roasters Gain Ideas, Inspiration From Brewers Feature by

Across the country, craft breweries have coffee specialists going far beyond mere coffee-beer collaborations. Taking notes from beer, coffee shops hope to increase conversation and connectivity between the parallel crafts, opening both to new customers and ideas.

Craig Weitzel: The Modern Maltster Will Work For Beer by

Set foot inside Riverbend Malt House in Asheville, N.C., and it’s clear that the maltster has a similar role to the brewer’s. While employees who work at large malt houses may see grain move at the push of a button, at Riverbend much is still human-powered.

A Case For Brown Ales BYOB by

Brownish ales have a long history, but what we’re talking about is the classic Brown Ale born in Britain and transmogrified here. To me, Brown Ales have roasty, toasty brown bread tones that hang out over a medium malted beer with a restrained caramel sweetness.

Stemming the Rise of Barley Diseases: How Nasty Fungal Infections Could Affect Our Grains and Beer Feature by

The world produced over 134 million metric-tons of barley between 2011 and 2012. But up to 95 percent of the world’s barley is susceptible to a variety of a fungal disease called stem rust that was discovered in Uganda in 1999. Dubbed Ug99, it has spread across East Africa and up into the Middle East.

Throwback Brewery From the Source by

Located in North Hampton, N.H., Throwback strives to source as many of its ingredients from local farms as possible. That includes using locally grown hops, malt and adjuncts.