Tag: Beer History

How World War I Changed Pub Culture, and Beer Itself History by the Glass by

WWI had a permanent legacy. UK beer became relatively weak and pubs remained closed for much of the day.

3 Chicha de Jora Myths, Debunked Travel by

In terms of texture and appearance, the malted white corn beer known as Chicha de Jora bears a striking resemblance to milkshake IPAs. But since it’s naturally carbonated and unhopped, the similarities end there.

Alsace: Europe’s Great Forgotten Beer Culture Feature by

Alsace is France’s brewing powerhouse: Around 60 percent of the beer drunk in the country is brewed here, and the vast majority of its hops are grown here, too. Now the region is enjoying a revival.

Mountain Magic: Spontaneous Fermentations from Peru’s Sacred Valley Feature by

The chosen tipple in rural Peru isn’t Kellerbier, Světlýý Ležák, or Best Bitter. It’s Chicha de Jora, a staple of the Incas who ruled as far back as the 14th and 15th centuries. And it still thrives in many Andean villages and towns today.

A. Fisher Brewing Company: Reviving a Utah Legacy From the Source by

By reviving one of Salt Lake City’s beloved heritage brands with a distinctively modern approach, A. Fisher Brewing Company has earned the admiration of beer drinkers young and old.

A Look Inside the Pilsener Club, One of Amsterdam’s Storied Brown Cafés Barkeep by

Founded in 1893, The Pilsener Club is one of the finest examples of Amsterdam’s brown cafés, cozy pubs named for the characteristic patina built up on their walls.

The Mystery of Barclay Perkins’ Sparkling Beer History by the Glass by

Not only was Barclay’s innovative in lager brewing, it was also one of the first breweries to start canning. And there was one beer where these two acts of daring combined: Sparkling Beer.

Kulmbacher: Strong, Dark, and Hoppy History by the Glass by

Before the proliferation of Pilsner, Germany had Kulmbacher—a strong, dark, and surprisingly hoppy lager.

Looking to the Past for Inspiration, Brewers Gravitate to Gruit News by

Breweries around the globe are bucking the hazy, hoppy trend by devoting at least some of their energies to Gruit, a medieval ale made with a variety of botanicals. Although small, the worldwide movement to bring more attention to it has gained steam, and is recognized with International Gruit Day.

A Pioneer, Reinvented: The Humble Beginnings and Hopeful Future of Seattle’s Redhook Brewery Feature by

Washington’s oldest and largest craft brewery plans to tackle slowing sales by taking a cue from the hyper-local breweries that have appeared in its wake. Enter Brewlab, Redhook’s new brewpub focused on innovation.

Session Imperial Stout Approaches Its Centennial History by the Glass by

While it may sound like a style that could only be conceived in today’s genre-pushing beer world, Session Imperial Stout is nearly 100 years old.

Against All Hops: Techniques and Philosophy for Creating Extraordinary Botanical Beers Shelf Talker by

Whether you’re a brewer with dirt under your fingernails or rubber gloves on your hands, this book from the owner of Earth Eagle Brewings will inspire you to think beyond the bines.

Live Long and Prosper: How Two Family Breweries Continue to Compete Generations After Opening Feature by

A look at two of the longest-running family breweries in the US—New York’s F.X. Matt and Minnesota’s August Schell—explores the challenges they faced and the ways these companies survived when others disappeared after Prohibition.

Albany, New York: America’s Forgotten Beer City History by the Glass by

No longer known as a beer mecca, Albany, N.Y., was once the epicenter of beer production in the US, shipping Albany Ale as far as the Hawaiian Islands.

Recipe Revival: Early American Brewing Survives at Museums The Blending House by

By recreating historic recipes—sometimes on period-appropriate equipment—museums and beer historians are working to preserve early American brewing traditions.

Fading in Popularity: East Germany’s Beer Styles History by the Glass by

A document detailing the 22 styles of beer permitted in East Germany offers a glimpse into the former country’s Cold War-era brewing culture.

Europe’s Puzzling Nobility: Hops from the Styrian Hinterland Behind the Bines by

US drinkers might soon become more familiar with four new flavor hops from Slovenia, in addition to the Styrian region’s already well-known Noble hops.

Brewing in the Land of the Thunder Dragon: The Farmhouse Beer Culture of Buddhist Bhutan Feature by

While most Asian cultures make alcohol from rice, the Bhutanese farmhouse ales Sin Chang and Bang Chang start with 100 percent raw wheat. Reserved for religious and special occasions, these Wheatwines are a part of life for many.

Fuller’s London Pride: A Variable, Veritable Classic History by the Glass by

While the Fuller’s London Pride poured at pubs across London may appear unchanged over the decades, there was tinkering going on behind the scenes.

Trappist Beer Travels and Ancient Brews Shelf Talker by

Learn the origin stories of the 11 current Trappist breweries, as told by the monks themselves, and go back in time with “Dr. Pat” to unearth and recreate eight ancient ale recipes.

A Journey Through the Past: London Brews Porter Again Feature by

While it once represented up to three-quarters of the beer drunk in London, Porter’s popularity took a big hit after WWII. Today, enterprising brewers with a passion for the style and its history are rescuing this dark ale from obscurity.

Draught Bass: A Neglected Icon History by the Glass by

The quality and popularity of the once-iconic Draught Bass has been on a steady decline since the 1980s. With the brand up for sale, could it be saved?

Tree Beer: Brewing with Wafer Ash Behind the Bines by

Taking a cue from resourceful homebrewers in the past, Jester King Brewery tries replacing hops with the bitter fruit of the wafer ash tree.

Ancient Ales: Breweries Find New Fans with Old Recipes Feature by

While many brewers chase experimental hop strains, sequence yeast, and use technology to dial in new recipes, a handful of others are looking to the past for inspiration, hoping that ancient ales will excite a new generation of drinkers.