Tag: Beer History

  
The Changing Fortunes of Milk Stout History by the Glass by

How a 1911 court case against a South London brewery producing Milk Stout without a license cemented the style’s definition as a beer brewed with lactose.

Steve Dresler, Sierra Nevada’s Brewmaster, Reflects on His Career and the Industry’s Future Last Call by

Since he began working at Sierra Nevada in 1983, Steve Dresler has helped lead the company from 2,000 barrels a year to over a million.

Milk Stout: Innovative, Energizing, and Nutritious? History by the Glass by

How Mackeson, a provincial brewery on the south coast of England, patented a lactose-based formula in 1909 and created the Milk Stout.

Leave the Abbey, Join the Playground: The Crucial Influence of Foreign Breweries on Belgian Beer Feature by

With a focus on experimentation and, especially, hops, a new generation of Belgian brewers takes its inspiration not from its Trappist or Lambic-producing forefathers, but from brewers in the US and the UK.

In Remembrance: Best Mild History by the Glass by

In remembrance of Best Mild, a beer popular in 1950s England that was usually a somewhat stronger and darker version of a brewery’s Ordinary Mild.

Pabst Brews in Milwaukee for the First Time in Decades News by

Brewing has returned to the massive Pabst complex with Pabst Milwaukee Brewery, a microbrewery and restaurant, in a 144-year-old building that once served as a pub for Pabst employees.

Historian Theresa McCulla Embarks on the Smithsonian’s American Brewing History Initiative Last Call by

In her new role overseeing the American Brewing History Initiative, Theresa McCulla has been sifting through the National Museum of American History’s brewing collections.

Living Beer Styles and the Death of William Younger’s XXP History by the Glass by

Following the evolution of William Younger’s XXP over time, from a premium export IPA clocking in at 200 IBU to a standard pub Bitter.

The Return of Whitbread Pale Ale History by the Glass by

Last year Whitbread Pale Ale was relaunched in the UK, brewed by the highly regarded Windsor & Eton. Let’s not worry too much about whether it’s an IPA, Pale Ale, or Light Ale. Just rejoice at the return of Whitbread’s iconic hind logo.

Portner Brewhouse Opening Revives Family Brewing Legacy News by

Catherine and Margaret Portner, sisters and great-great granddaughters of 19th century brewer Robert Portner, revived the family legacy by opening Portner Brewhouse in Alexandria, Va.

Breaking Bread with Seto Õlu: Uncovering a Forgotten Kingdom’s Brewing Tradition Feature by

Hidden in Eastern Europe and forgotten for centuries, the fruity, slightly sweet, and full-bodied õlu, or beer, made by the Seto people is reminiscent of British Mild Ale, Kvass, a beverage made from fermented bread, and even root beer.

Newcastle Brown Ale: A Quintessential, Atypical Beer History by the Glass by

Known as “the Dog” in its home of England, Newcastle’s ubiquitous Brown Ale was atypical in its strength and production methods when it debuted in 1927.

Gold Label: A Revolutionary Beer History by the Glass by

In the 1950s, Tennant Brothers advertised Gold Label, its pale Barleywine, as a beer “as strong as a double whiskey and half the price.”

January 2017 News: Belgian Beer’s Cultural Heritage, White Labs Asheville Opens, Brewing with Heirloom Barley, and a Record Year for US Hops News by

In a round-up of beer news, Belgian beer is recognized as cultural heritage; White Labs Asheville begins production, New Holland brews lager with heirloom barley; and 2016 is a record year for US hop growers.

The Surprising History of the Session IPA History by the Glass by

Scottish and English brewing records from over a century ago reveal a surprising number of low-ABV hoppy beers that look a lot like today’s trendy Session IPAs.

The Future of Beer is Unpredictable, and That’s a Good Thing Unfiltered by

We can’t predict the future, though we may try. Whatever happens to individual brands, however, one thing appears clear: flavorful beer is here to stay.

Past Perfect: Coolships Take Off Around the Country Tools of the Trade by

While anachronistic, the coolship is now used by more than two dozen breweries across the US to create spontaneously fermented ales in the Lambic tradition.

Heavy Medal: A Brief History of the Great American Beer Fest Awards By The Numbers by

The history of the Great American Beer Festival is the history of craft brewing magnified. It started in 1982 as a one-night event, held during the fourth annual National Homebrew and Microbrewery Conference.

Brewing Local: American-Grown Beer Shelf Talker by

In his fourth book, Stan Hieronymus writes for brewers who want to use locally grown ingredients but aren’t sure where to start.

State-Controlled Pubs History by the Glass by

Beginning as a government effort to curb drinking by WWI munitions workers, state-controlled pubs persisted in some English towns until the 1970s.

The Myth of the Spurned Drinker Unfiltered by

Bad beer won’t take down the craft brewing industry, but it’s up to bar owners and consumers to speak up when something tastes off.

Baltic Brewing: In Estonia, a Farmhouse Tradition Survives Feature by

The remote Estonian islands, an hours-long journey from the capital of Tallinn, have preserved many of the country’s cultural traditions, including brewing the rustic farmhouse ale Koduõlu.

The Rise and Fall of Beer Houses History by the Glass by

England’s attempt to create a free market in beer led to an explosion of small, beer-only pubs—and the beginning of the end for Porter.

Nowhere To Go But Up Unfiltered by

Despite comparisons to the industry housecleaning of the mid-1990s, today’s brewery landscape looks nothing like that of 20 years ago.