Tag: History

Burning River Pale Ale by Great Lakes Brewing Co. Label Approval by

Referencing the infamous Cuyahoga River fire of 1969, the revamped image for Burning River Pale Ale took inspiration from recycled materials to help symbolize Burning River’s environmental message, and incorporates newspaper clippings from the fire and text from the 1972 Clean Water Act.

Tally-Ho Fermented Culture by

Adnams Brewery records dating back to 1878 offer a great opportunity: A chance to see how one beer changed over the course of more than a century.

Breathing New Life into Old St. Nick Brick & Mortar by

Wood from an old barn, floor pieces from a local bowling alley, and refurbished fixtures from the original structure make up the restored hotel that houses St. Nicholas Brewing Company in Du Quoin, Ill.

Brewing in WWII Fermented Culture by

War impacted British brewing both directly and indirectly. Government action is a good example of a direct influence.

Crafty Bastards: Beer in New England, from the Mayflower to Modern Day Shelf Talker by

In this book, you’ll learn about the original recipe for “pompion” (pumpkin) ale, the Puritans’ attempt to ban molasses in brewing, and the first scientific paper on malting.

Crossing Cultures: Making a True Sake-Beer Hybrid Feature by

The idea of marrying sake and beer has been around for a while, but a hybrid has never been made in any great quantity. One of the issues is that many brewers, in spite of their creativity, do not have experience with sake.

German Pilsener Fermented Culture by

Anyone who tells you East German beer was terrible either never drank any, is a liar, or only tried Gothauer beer. Best German Pilsener I’ve ever had? Mühlhausener Pilsator.

Bittersweet Symphony: How Beer Is Informing Today’s Generation of Cider Makers Feature by

As with beer, craft cider is aiming for people with more sophisticated palates. And one of the first things modern cider makers have done is dry the palate out. To lure beer drinkers, cider makers in the Pacific Northwest started adding hops.

Green Acres Behind the Bines by

If craft production is going to double in the next few years—per the Brewers Association’s goal of a 20 percent sales share by 2020—farmers will need to plant and harvest about another 18,000 acres of hops just to meet demand from craft brewers.

Brew, Brew, Brew For the Home Team: Craft Beer Makes Inroads at Stadiums and Sporting Arenas Feature by

As smaller, independent breweries have steadily chipped away at the market share held by larger national or multinational competition, they’ve also found ways to move into spaces formerly controlled by Big Beer—like Major League stadiums.

Kuit Fermented Culture by

I was a little surprised to see that the Brewers Association had added Dutch Kuit to their style guidelines. It’s a pretty obscure style, even in Holland.

Brevnovský Klášterní Pivovar Sv. Vojtecha From the Source by

Brevnovský Pivovar has an annual production of about 2,500 barrels. Most of that is its Pale Lager, but it also makes an Imperial Stout, a Baltic Porter and an IPA, all rarities in lager-loving central Europe. For the moment, however, none of the brewery’s beers are regularly exported out of the Czech Republic.

Better by Degrees: Why Cold Storage Matters to Your Beer Feature by

Craft breweries of all sizes are shipping their beer to far-flung accounts. So how do they maintain the condition of their beer, please fickle customers, and simultaneously grow their brands? The answer is cold storage.

London’s Railway Arch Drinking Beer Without Borders by

Beer and railways have a lot of history in London, dating from the 1830s. Today, no less than 14 of the capital’s more than 50 breweries are housed within railway arches of above ground train tracks.

Winter Beer and Summer Beer Fermented Culture by

No, Sommerbier and Winterbier are not seasonal specials. At least not in the sense you’re thinking. They’re two of the earliest lager styles, now almost completely forgotten, though traces of them remain.

Danziger Joppenbier Fermented Culture by

Who thought spontaneous fermentation was unique to Belgium? It wasn’t, and lasted well into the 19th century in other parts of Europe. I’m not talking about Gose or another sour wheat style, but about one of the strangest beers brewed in recent times: Danziger Joppenbier.

Tetley’s Mild Fermented Culture by

In a way, Tetley’s Mild tells the story of British beer. Constantly changing, and not just the gravity, but also the flavor and even the color.

Table Beer Fermented Culture by

In the 18th century, there were three tax classes in England (in descending order of strength): Strong, Table and Small. The definition of these classes was very simple, as it was based on the wholesale price.

Bucket List Bars: Historic Saloons, Pubs and Dives of America Shelf Talker by

Why we’re reading Bucket List Bars: Historic Saloons, Pubs and Dives of America.

Drinking Boston: A History of the City and Its Spirits Shelf Talker by

Why we’re reading Drinking Boston: A History of the City and Its Spirits.

American Ales Circa 1900 Fermented Culture by

The continued connection between American and British ales throughout the 19th century is unexpected but fascinating.

Vassar Ale Fermented Culture by

The Matthew Vassar who brewed Vassar Ale later founded the college in Poughkeepsie that bears his name. That connection is almost certainly why Vassar’s papers have been preserved.

Where There’s Water, Beer Can Flow Brick & Mortar by

Arthur Farley considered this relationship between water and beer while scouting a location for his Brasserie St. James brewpub in Reno, Nev. He decided on the old Crystal Springs Water building in Midtown. The kicker? The artesian well 300 feet below the building.

Married, With Beer Party-Gyle by

Beer has been integral to weddings and other festivities throughout history, much more so than champagne. In fact, the word “bridal” derives from “bride ale.”